This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Priceless Vol 10 Number 10


Personal and Professional Empowerment www.hamptonroadsmessenger.com


Serving Norfolk, Portsmouth, Chesapeake, Hampton, Newport News, Suffolk, and Virginia Beach since 2006


NSU and HU 2016 Graduation Photos


Page 8-9


Muhammad Ali: The Greatest Lessons from 'The Greatest'


The Other Jackie


Robinson Story Page 6


A Birthday Celebration for Joe Dudley, Sr.


Page 15


Pelican’s Snoballs of Hampton Holds Ribbon Cutting


Free June 2016


Muhammad Ali during training for his fight with Al ‘Blue’ Lewis held in Dublin, Republic of Ireland in 1972. GETTY IMAGES


BY MONÉE FIELDS-WHITE One of boxing’s most


legendary fighters, Muhammad Ali, has passed away. He died on Friday, June 3 in Arizona after being hospitalized for respiratory problems. He was 74. Ali had long been in decline as a result of the Parkinson’s symptoms he developed soon after his boxing career ended. As celebrated as he was for his performance inside the ring— amassing 56 wins, 37 of them knockouts, in a career that spanned more than 20 years— his status beyond the ring evolved over the decades. The brash, graceful young athlete who targeted his opponents with boastful yet poetic taunts became a political warrior vilified for his controversial positions during the civil rights era, before becoming a beloved, if increasingly silenced, elder statesman in retirement.


Born Cassius Marcellus


Clay Jr. in Louisville, Ky., on Jan. 17, 1942, he started boxing at age 12, winning his first bout in 1954 by split decision. Clay won the 1956 Golden Gloves Championship for novices in the light-heavyweight class and three years later won the Golden Gloves Tournament of Champions. He turned pro soon after winning the light-heavy- weight gold medal at the 1960 Olympics in Rome.


At 6 feet 3 and 190


pounds, Clay used his quick feet and sharp jabs to dominate in the ring. He would use his mouth just as effectively, and from the start often held court at press conferences. In one of his most famous self-appraisals, he declared that he could “float like a butterfly, sting like a bee.” He backed up his statements in the ring, knocking out British heavyweight champion Henry Cooper in 1963 and taking out


MUHAMMAD ALI PAGE 4 This Edition’s Highlights


Health Editorial Your Opinion Matters Hampton Roads Upcoming Events Scholarships Watch


CDC: 1 in 3 Antibiotic Prescriptions Unnecessary Rethinking Who We Revere Development of African Americans Simon Breaks Ground on Norfolk Premium Outlets Living Healthy & Smoke-Free Opportunities for Minority Law Students 5


4 7


12 13 11


Part of building a strong foundation


for a child’s financial future is taking steps to minimize the risk that his or her Social Security number, bank account details or other valuable personal information will be stolen. Here are tips to help parents and caregivers protect young people from cyber-related identity theft and financial fraud.


Talk with your child about safe online


practices. Consider discussing the risks of sharing personal information online, including the possibility that someone can gather small amounts of personal information to guess the correct answers to security questions, reset passwords and take control of financial accounts.


PROTECTING PAGE 3


Pelican’s Snoballs of Hampton officially celebrated its grand opening with a ribbon cutting attended by Councilman Donnie Tuck, (at right in photo).


Pelican’s Snoballs of Hampton officially


celebrated its grand opening on Friday, May 27, with a ribbon cutting at 2 pm. More than 40 community members, including Councilman Donnie Tuck, attended the ceremony.


Pelican’s Snoballs of Hampton, located


at 1025 West Pembroke Ave., is a franchise independently owned and operated by Mario and Jamil Trotter, who believe in providing a great outdoor and family-friendly atmosphere for all ages. The husband and wife team came to Hampton through successful careers in the Air Force and are now putting their talents to work as entrepreneurs.


Striving to stay true to the “Original New


Orleans” treat, Pelican’s offers more than 100 flavors shipped directly from Louisiana. The Pelican’s experience will include games on the premises, such as giant Jenga, corn hole and hula-hoops. There will also be family game nights, paint nights and other great childhood favorites for the entire family to enjoy while experiencing the delicious New Orleans style shaved ice.


Pelican’s will be open from March to


mid-October, seven days a week, 11 a.m.-9 p.m.; and 11 a.m.- 10 p.m. when school is not in session.


For Parents and Caregivers: Tips for Protecting Your Child’s Personal Information


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