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INTERIORS


The Eastern Eye, Bath


The Eastern Eye restaurant in Bath presents a relatively modest exterior so visitors may be forgiven for doing a double take upon entering. Set in a grand, vaulted Georgian ballroom, overlooked by three glass domes, the restaurant’s most awe-inspiring feature are the massive hand painted Indian murals that line the restaurant’s three main walls. In an explosion of rich, vibrant colours, they portray scenes in a Moghul Palace with dancers, musicians and worshippers, creating a lavish and opulent atmosphere beloved by celebrities. The Eastern Eye has been run by Mr Abdul Choudhury and his family since 1984 (in its present location from 1997). The paintings have a more recent provenance than the building’s history suggests and are the work of award-winning international artist, Apulpan Ditt, who befriended Mr Choudhury in Dubai in 2004. Mr Choudhury invited Mr Ditt to revamp the interior of his restaurant in the UK. The 42-year-old artist worked through the night for two months, to spectacular effect. “I was so pleased with the finished product,” said Mr Choudhury. “I asked my customers what they thought and everybody says it is out of this world. These paintings have changed the way people see the restaurant. They give it a truly unique aesthetic appeal.”


Cinnamon Kitchen, London


The collection of photographs in Cinnamon Kitchen was originally commissioned for sister restaurant the Cinnamon Club and there is more to them than meets the eye. “The idea behind the collection is tradition meets modern,” says marketing manager Helen Geach. “You will notice that a lot of the images are of very traditional Indian street scenes, however if you look closer you will see that the subject is holding a modern piece of technology such as a phone or mac book. Or perhaps they are reading a Top Gear magazine or Financial Times.”


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