This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Specialist Coating


Inspection & Consulting


FEATURE SPONSOR


PROTECTIVE COATINGS


Gunnar is a second generation coatings- inspector & consultant with 23 years of corrosion-protection experience. As MD of SCICON worldwide bvba, he holds an SSPC PCI Level III-, SSPC PCS (Protective Coatings Specialist) & NACE CIP Level III Certification.


Howie, a FROSIO Level III Coating Inspector, multiple-patent holder and former Technical Director of a UK paint manufacturing company, notes cost factors.


“Actual paint costs are relatively small compared to onshore construction phase application costs,” he explains. “If contractors get it wrong and have to correct things offshore, the paint costs to application costs ratio is astronomical – reaching 0.1 to 99.9 (1:999) in one case study. Using the wrong paint is that expensive!


“We stop small problems becoming large expensive problems by putting the right quality assurance and quality control in place early.”


WHICH RISK SCENARIO APPLIES TO YOU? The paper’s case studies cover common offshore and marine problem/solution/ benefit corrosion-protection scenarios.


Project A


Involved no initial QA inspections but included failure-analysis and repair consultation following premature offshore coating failures.


Project B


Full-time QA coating inspectors working for the main contractor avoided €-multi-million repair work.


Project C


A joint-venture between two sub-contractor steel construction companies. Sub- Contractor 1 covered 58% of the new-build structures; Sub-Contractor 2 42%.


Blistering problems on circa 6m2 of two


substation transformer covers after two years at sea highlighted the difficulty of allowing small components subbed out and then subbed out again, to slip through the QA net. Original client specifications are easily lost or diluted down the supply chain.


Sub-Contractor 1, SCICON worldwide bvba and Howard Jess Solutions provided a full team of certified and experienced QC- inspectors with full stop/go-authority. No claims were made in the first two years.


Sub-Contractor 2, which hired two separate freelance inspectors under its own QC-department (with no training/ certification), was less fortunate.


PROJECT A


‘BAND OF BLISTERS’ OFFSHORE WINDFARM


Remedial work cost circa €100.000. Investing a couple €-thousand in fully- trained, qualified and certified coating- inspectors before and during the original coating application would have avoided the whole problem. Specifically, the covers of two auxiliary transformers passed so far down the supply chain that although the coated area was minimal, specifications, procedures and quality-control were lost.


In the first year offshore, white zinc-salt formation under a coating applied onto Thermal Sprayed Zinc (TSZ) caused blistering. Failure analysis revealed the ultimate coating-system not complying with ISO 12944, or the client’s original specification.


In reality, a two-coat powder-coating- system of suspect quality was used on top of a poorly-applied TSZ. The originally specification required a five- coat liquid-applied coasting-system - including a zinc-rich primer, two water-based intermediate coats, plus two water-based top coats.


Repair work while the 150,000 volt transformers were live in poor weather conditions, during complex transfer operations and with stringent offshore safety certification requirements, meant a final bill of up to ± €16.666/m2


!


All this could have been avoided… rather easily.


CONTINUED...


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


85


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92