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FEATURE SPONSOR


INTER-ARRAY CABLES


Lars explains that it is a combination of the Siem Moxie’s Ulstein X-Bow design hull form as well as a powerful dynamic positioning (short DP) system and stabilisers, all coupled with an active motion compensated gangway used to transfer people to and from foundations in high winds and waves. She has accommodation for sixty people on board, and can stay offshore for long periods.


It’s his friend’s turn to pause, before asking, “When can we charter her?!”


A ‘STEP CHANGE’ IN OFFSHORE WINDFARM ARRAY CABLE INSTALLATION APPROACH The Siem Moxie represents a significant technological innovation in the construction of offshore windfarms, with a specific focus on foundation works related to submarine cable installation. A result of a carefully process oriented design considerations, based on client feedback and drawing upon nearly twenty years’ experience in submarine cable installation, the Siem Moxie has been built to satisfy a long standing demand for an alternative approach to undertake various support works on offshore windfarm foundations.


On traditional installation projects, personnel were typically delivered to the foundations via sea-level boat-landing/ ladder structures on the outside of the foundation. A so called Crew Transfer Vessel (CTV for short) would push up against the fenders on either side of the ladder on the foundation and technicians would step across from the bow fender to the ladder and then commence to climb up to the working platform of the foundation. This activity was typically very weather sensitive specifically in relation to wave height, and - if delayed - could delay the entire installation campaign.


Equipment needed to perform cable pull-in and termination works would either be pre-installed, delivered by a larger ship via on-board cranes, or hoisted to the working platform by davits or small cranes from a CTV on the foundations thereby eating into a significant portion of the available time required for the safe installation of the submarine cables.


THE SIEM MOXIE IS DIFFERENT Central to the Siem Moxie is a walk-to- work (short W2W) gangway, designed and manufactured by the Norwegian firm Uptime International. This gangway is active motion compensated, compensating not just for heave, but also pitch and roll using a pedestal mounted compensation system. This is combined with the fully redundant DP-2 system as well as stabilisation tanks and Voith Schneider propulsion to deliver an incredibly stable solution for transferring personnel from the vessel directly to the working platform (or Transition Piece) of the foundations, ready to commence cable installation works.


The Siem Moxie furthermore has a ‘3D motion compensated crane’ developed by Norway-based MacGregor, which is used to transfer all required equipment from the back deck of the Siem Moxie onto the foundations. This leaves the cable lay vessel to focus on laying and trenching of submarine cables, whilst the operational critical path is balanced between the vessel involved in the cable installation activities and the support activities of the Siem Moxie.


TRIED AND TESTED


The Amrumbank West offshore windfarm inner array cable installation project was Siem Offshore Contractors’ opportunity to demonstrate that the next generation of far from shore offshore windfarm projects can be supported safely and cost-effectively based on a new approach whereby submarine cables were installed in unprecedented weather conditions, and at record speeds.


Now the Siem Moxie is moving onto its next challenge, the Nordsee One offshore windfarm where, no doubt, the Siem Moxie will carry on turning heads.


Siem Offshore Contractors Click to view more info


www.windenergynetwork.co.uk


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