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• Medication • Backpack/duffle bag • Whistle (to attract attention, if needed) • Playing cards


In addition to their basic Emergency Survival Kits, it is essential that senior citizens being evacuated during emergencies take with them any other equipment or devices they may need immediately.


Those items may include: • Assistive devices such as canes, walkers, hearing aids, breathing apparatus, etc.


• Prescription eyewear and footwear • Extra medications and vitamin supplements • Copies of prescriptions • Extra dentures (if required) and cleaner • Personal papers, identification; and • List of names and telephone numbers (such as family members, doctor, case worker, seniors’ group contact person, etc.).


Seniors in high-rise buildings High-rise buildings present unique challenges when evacuating. Residents should make themselves aware of:





All escape routes and location of emergency doors/exits on each floor


• Location of emergency buttons. Many seniors’ buildings have, strategically located in bedrooms and washrooms, emergency buttons which have a direct link to 911 or the building’s superintendent.


• The building’s evacuation plan • The building superintendent’s phone number • Who conducts evacuation drills, and how often


• Who sits on the Building Safety Committee • Who are the floor monitors in the event of an emergency


• The names and phone numbers of on-site doctors, social workers and the hours they keep (if applicable). These people will likely be on call at various times throughout the week and will usually have an office in the building.


High-rise building managers can help those senior residents who may have difficulty evacuating on their own due to a physical impairment or disability, by:


• Maintaining an up-to-date list of names and addresses of all seniors in the building, noting the special needs and requirements of each, and copying that list to superintendents.


• Making available large printed signs for those requiring assistance to place in their window in the event of an emergency, indicating that they require assistance.


Since emergency supply requirements vary for individuals with special needs and different disabilities, please refer to the Emergency Preparedness Guide for People with Disabilities/ Special Needs located on the City of Brantford


website www.brantfordfire.ca/associatedDocs/em_disabilities.pdf


Step 5: PRACTICE AND MAINTAIN YOUR PLAN


Practicing your emergency plan will help make sure you take appropriate actions in a real emergency situation. You should review your plan regularly and update contact numbers and meeting locations, as needed.


In addition to practicing your plan, make sure to replace the food and water in your emergency survival kit and in your pet emergency survival kit once every six months.


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