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swimming pools & water treatment


Passivhaus swimming pool


The UK’s first Passivhaus swimming pool and leisure centre is set to deliver impressive savings of up to 70 per cent on energy costs.


Exeter Active is a key element of the


city’s Health and Wellbeing Board’s aspiration for Exeter to be the most physically active in the south west by 2018. Twenty two per cent of the Exeter adult population is obese, as well as 16 per cent of year six children. More than 70 per cent of the Exeter population is not currently active enough to achieve any physical or mental health benefits. Modern facilities that are attractive to use can help to address this issue. There are a number of strategic factors


which underpin the case for a new city centre swimming pool in Exeter. These are: • The need for better quality swimming pool provision to meet 21st century community expectation


EXETER City Council was the first UK Council to develop social housing constructed to Passivhaus standards. Now, it is applying the rigorous sustainability standard to Exeter Active, a new pool and leisure centre planned for the city centre to replace the ageing and inefficient Pyramids pool. The term Passivhaus refers to a rigorous,


voluntary standard for energy efficiency in a building. It results in ultra-low energy buildings that require little energy for space heating or cooling, while providing high levels of occupant comfort. They are built with meticulous attention to detail according to design and construction principles developed by the Passivhaus Institute in Germany, and can be certified through an exacting quality assurance process.


• The need for increased pool capacity to meet current as well as future demand, given the scale and timescale of population growth


• The need for accessible water space to which users can walk; a city centre location will best address the needs of the 26 per cent without access to private transport, given the central location will be on public transport routes


• The need for flexible water space to meet the needs of casual swimmers, those learning to swim, clubs, competition swimmers and lessons


• The need for water space which is fit for purpose, well-designed, effective and efficient to operate The Exeter Active project team is joined by representatives from the Passivhaus


Institute, the German-based home of the Passivhaus standard. The involvement of the Institute in the Exeter Active project will ensure the team is provided with expert guidance on best practice in Passivhaus design for leisure centres. The Exeter Active design team also


includes Passivhaus architects, Gale & Snowden Architects, specialists in sustainable building techniques. The practice worked with the council to deliver the UK’s first Passivhaus social housing, and its design for Exeter Active will deliver a saving of at least 70 per cent in energy consumption over a standard UK leisure centre. The Passivhaus standard focusses


primarily on the energy demand of the building in operation. As energy usage accounts for more than a third of the cost of running a leisure centre with swimming pools, the Passivhaus standard will have a


52 leisuredab.co.uk


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