This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Building Services & Maintenance


Joe Cilia looks at the impact of an increased focus on wellbeing in the workplace and what this means for design, specification and management


Well building syndrome W


orkplace interiors can make people ill. But they could also be better designed


and managed to promote health and wellbeing. This is potentially a building revolution that is likely to change the way facilities are managed, but, putting people first in this way allows for more variation in design and fit-out, creating spaces for communicating, relaxing and quiet reflection, as well as for those moments when workers need no distractions to get on and finish a job. Instead of being unwell and unproductive, workers would be happy and more productive, and employers would get a bigger bang for their buck. Reading University professor Derek Clements-Croome recently co-authored a report for the British Council for Offices called ‘Putting People First: Designing for Health and Wellbeing in the Built Environment’. He says there is increasing medical evidence that bad workplaces, where people either sit or stand all day, are damaging and costly. The UK lost 131 million days of work in 2013, and 27 million of them were down to backache and musculoskeletal problems.


96 FACILITIES “You need to break up offices to allow


for movement around,” Clements-Croome says. In Germany and Scandinavia, firms already use intelligent chairs and desks with sensors built in. These tell staff to get up and walk around when they have been sitting down for too long. And mental wellbeing is as important as physical wellbeing. “You need to break up the working day to let your brain refresh,” says Clements-Croome. “And you need more than just a coffee area that people go to and return from. You need space where people can bump into each other – mingle space.” The author of this report adds that using different colours can add a “wow factor”, be that the décor or art on the walls, and greenery has a calming effect. “That’s not just the odd pot plant here and there, but proper landscaping. We’re seeing buildings with internal gardens,” he says. Such features will need maintaining, monitoring and, often, retrofitting. But employee wellbeing can also be monitored using post-occupancy evaluation surveys that provide the data to compare design objectives against occupier reality. Design consultant Elina Grigoriou


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160