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Security


end-users will be missing out on the latest developments in security provision that could make a real difference to the way they do business, as well as their resilience against unexpected security breaches.


Quality counts Regular review


Author information


James Kelly is Chief Executive of the British Security Industry Association. www.bsia.co.uk


It is not just when procuring a completely new product or service that a security consultant should be consulted. Businesses should be reviewing their security strategies, policies and plans regularly to ensure that they still meet the requirements of the business. Mike O’Neill, Chairman of the BSIA’s Specialist Services section, explains: “At the heart of any business’s security and its resilience to threats is the risk register. This is a key risk management tool that helps a business identify the day-to-day risks that it faces and the best ways to counteract them.” Simply having plans in place is not enough; businesses should routinely check and exercise their plans in order to ensure that they are fi t for purpose. This is an area of concern which also arose from the BSIA’s research in 2015. The majority of respondents revealed that their security is only reviewed every four to fi ve years, with some reporting that their security solutions are never revisited following the initial purchase. With technology, regulation and standards developing at such a rapid pace, many


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Fundamentally, security should be a primary consideration for businesses of all sizes, who may often underestimate the potential impact of the risks they face. The products and services offered by private security providers – and the increased potential for systems integration – can help businesses to mitigate these risks. However, it is important to ensure that the services being procured are appropriate to the levels of current and indeed emerging threats. Involving a security consultant in the procurement process is an ideal way to ensure that the services and products being sought meet the needs of the business, are of a suffi cient quality and are cost-effective. When employing the services of a security consultant, it is absolutely essential that you ensure they have extensive experience in assisting businesses with their security requirements and have individual or corporate memberships to relevant bodies which are an indicator of quality. Individual memberships include the Register of Chartered Security Professionals or the Register of Security Experts and Specialists; corporate memberships include the British Security Industry Association Specialist Services Section or the Association of Security Consultants. When procuring any security product or service, quality should always be the dominant factor in decision-making. It is important to ensure that potential suppliers meet the relevant British standards for the products or services that they are providing. The company should be of good repute, have a good trading history and be members of recognised industry bodies. Members of the BSIA are required to meet strict quality criteria in order to remain eligible for membership of the Association, which demonstrates that the products and services they provide are of the highest quality. Choosing a reputable supplier will not only ensure that a superior service is delivered, but may also signifi cantly reduce the spending on security in the long term.


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