This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Catering


provision, on the basis of adopting the Catering Mark. In addition, Defra’s 2014 Plan for Public Procurement aims to realise the potential to improve the nation’s health, promote sustainable systems of food production and support UK farmers. From 2017, central government will commit to new buying standards. Accompanying guidance cites the Food for Life Catering Mark as a tool for caterers who wish to achieve a good or excellent performance against the award criteria. The Catering Mark provides independent verification that caterers are meeting Defra’s recommendations. Catering Mark holders are independently visited by an inspector and audited on an annual basis by the Soil Association. This gives them the assurance that their food meets high standards of provenance, freshness and quality. Local, sustainable and higher welfare products are key, and each are rewarded at bronze, silver and gold levels of the scheme. The standards are sector-specific, making it easier to apply the Catering Mark to different areas of food service. A caterer can choose to source more local ingredients, or more organic products, working towards a silver or gold Catering Mark with their customers’ priorities at heart. Standards are set by an independent Standards Committee made up of industry experts from a range of sectors. The entry-level Bronze Catering Mark has fixed standards that focus on removing harmful additives, trans fat and GM from the menu, and ensuring that 75% of dishes are freshly prepared through supporting staff development. At Rotherham Hospital, the NHS Foundation Trust and caterer ISS Healthcare decided to work towards the Bronze Catering Mark, as catering manager Martin Beaumont explains: “We decided to apply even before the CQUIN offered an additional incentive to make improvements.


It seemed an obvious next step for us and we recognised the benefits of having an independent endorsement for the provenance and quality of the food served.” The hospital team made the switch from using a large amount of processed foods, such as packet soups and jarred sauces, to producing more fresh food on-site, by re-skilling chefs and switching to fresh Red Tractor standard supplies of meat and dairy products. Meeting the criterion of 75% freshly prepared food in sandwich production was a particular challenge for such a large- scale operation. The ingredient spend per patient and labour costs increased, but this was met by switching to a single supplier with a large portfolio of Red Tractor products, as well as using innovative patient ordering systems to reduce waste and keep down costs.


A cost-effective alternative Good food doesn’t have to cost more. Historically, catering managers made their buying decisions based on keeping ingredient price low. Better quality food is assumed to be more expensive, but with the right training staff can make the most of cooking skills. With a greater understanding of seasonal food or using different cuts of meat, skilled staff can help make a nutritious meal that’s still within budget. Catering staff are empowered and engaged, and in addition the Catering Mark can contribute towards Corporate Social Responsibility plans. As Katie Whirledge of Busy Bees Nursery says: “Achieving the Catering Mark has proved to be a real boost for the catering team. It has given considerable value to the work they do every day and given our parents reassurance – especially in light of recent food provenance scandals. The mark is a guarantee for everyone.”


80 FACILITIES


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160