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will deliver even higher brightness levels. For Digital Cinema, generating 40,000 to 70,000 lumens with a slightly different technology based on pure RGB laser is already achievable. This means that laser projectors will eventually be used for far larger installation projects such as in huge rental and staging applications. Interestingly, one challenge in the brief history of laser is that engineers had to overcome the high cost of green lasers. With Laser Phosphor projectors, the red and green light is actually produced in other ways. By using a blue laser diode array that produces a light that hits yellow phosphorus, the emitted yellow light is, in turn, split by a prism into red and green light. This way the red-green-blue colour source is created as it is needed for projection via DLP or LCD. RGB laser enables a colour space that exceeds that of traditional xenon lamps and exceeds the DCI colour space used in the cinema industry.


Attractive TCO With far longer replacement intervals, laser technology shows its advantages in many ways; firstly the costly lamp no longer needs to be included in the cost calculation – there is no lamp. Offering up to 20,000 hours of operation, equating to nine lamp changes in a traditional lamp- based projector, laser technology delivers long lasting, consistent brightness with no lamp change required. Secondly, the act of replacing a lamp in a projector, for example hanging from a very high ceiling such as in a conference hall or lecture theatre, ceases to be a time and resource challenge requiring hire of a cherry picker or scaffolding equipment. Laser projectors are maintenance free, and coupled with lower power consumption, the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) calculation becomes even more attractive. Installation of laser projectors is today


far easier, as classification changes mean that specially trained laser officers are not required – previously this would have added complexity to the installation. Now, there are recommendations for health and safety but is it no longer in the realm of laser regulation and they are exactly the same for lamp-based projectors. For early adopters of laser, this transforms the installation process, making it easier, more cost-effective and quicker.


The initial capital outlay compares


favourably for laser. Even today, laser projectors with around 5,000 lumens are a cost effective alternative to traditional models without laser. In a TCO calculation, laser based projectors are the clear winner.


An environmental choice Despite delivering very high brightness output, laser is an exceptionally efficient source of light enjoying lower energy consumption and lower thermal emission compared to traditional lamp-based technology. Low power consumption is not only a TCO benefit, but also an environmental one; additionally, eliminating mercury lamps from the projection unit further reduces the impact on the environment.


Becoming standard


Once introduced into an organisation or education facility, laser projectors quickly replace their traditional counterparts. This goes some way to explaining forecasts for 2020 that 74 per cent of all installation projectors will be laser-lightsource based*. The qualitative brightness superiority and potential for energy savings combined with the significant reduction of maintenance costs makes it likely that SSL will eventually replace lamp-based projection systems as the primary projection light source. Apart from existing fields of usage such as large meeting rooms, schools and universities, the technology is now becoming more and more interesting for other industries or applications such as indoor signage, control room and 3D model simulation. New developments in laser technology


overcome the myths traditionally surrounding its use and there is clear evidence as to the low total cost of ownership, reliability and advanced nature of the technology, enabling more and more applications to be addressed by a laser light source – the bottom line is that SSL more closely addresses the needs of the market. The cinema, corporate and education sectors are early adopters of laser projection and are already reaping the benefits; laser is promising a bright future!


*http://www.futuresource-consulting. com/2015-02-SSI-Growth-Forecast.html





Laser projectors are maintenance free, and coupled with lower power consumption, the Total Cost of Ownership calculation becomes even more attractive





Further information


NEC’s Unique SSL Projector Portfolio NEC Display Solutions was an early adopter of SSL as a lighting method, despite industry speculation. The models available today are already second and third generation. In order to deliver the best possible performance with a wide variety of applications and to fulfil all customer needs, NEC Display Solutions makes use of all three major SSL technologies in their projectors: LED, Phosphor Laser and RGB Laser. With its unrivalled line-up of


solid state light source projectors NEC offers solutions for multiple applications across many vertical markets: From Digital Cinema where laser illumination creates an extraordinarily bright picture; to small meeting rooms, where the compact LED projector can deliver outstanding image quality. Especially for the large venue sector, NEC offers a huge range of laser projectors, covering almost any brightness level and screen size. For more information on NEC and laser technology, visit the NEC SSL microsite: www.ssl-nec.com


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