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Workplace


Laser projection technology: destined to become standard


Gerd Kaiser, Product Line Manager of NEC Display Solutions, explains why trends in projection technology promise a bright future for laser


light source; with no lamp or fi lter replacement necessary, operational costs are dramatically minimised offering a compelling proposition for resource- stretched organisations. Whatever visual experience organisations need to create, they are seeking the best possible image quality, brightness uniformity, and a long-term return on their investment. New developments in laser technology bring a solution which is both reliable and fl exible, yet built for longevity, without the high costs often associated with achieving that.


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Dispelling the myths Until recently, Laser, or SSL (Solid State Light source) may have seemed a long way from being widely available and the industry was somewhat sceptical about it, however, laser is now proving to be a viable technology for many projection applications. Today, the belief that laser


usinesses and Educators have been quick to recognise the benefi ts of laser as a projection


might be a steep investment; that it’s still in its early days; or that handling might be complicated because of laser regulations are only a myth. The fact is that laser has matured very quickly to a point at which it is now an easy to use working technology that quickly delivers an excellent return on investment.


Pure brightness


Solid State Light Sources (SSL) are light producing systems made up of either LED devices or Laser Diodes, producing light output levels from under 50 to over 50,000 Lumen. Light generated with SSL systems inherently have a longer and more stable brightness level that decreases at a much slower rate than conventional lamp-based systems. From a visual perspective, laser is


an investment that is already paying off. Viewers rate the image quality of laser-based projectors as far better than those of traditional lamp models. The DLP system, which is centred round a semiconductor with up to 8.85 million small, movable mirrors and combined with a light source, can project a bright image onto the canvas without loss of brightness. Laser light is characterised by a special property – it is extremely pure in colour, thus enabling a very wide colour gamut for an exceptionally rich and vivid image.


Laser Phosphor projectors are relatively compact but nevertheless very bright. In fact 6,000 to 8,000 with one chip technology and 12,000 lumens for three chip models are easy to achieve. Most people perceive that laser light is even brighter than that of an equivalent brightness projector using traditional lamp technology. In the coming years, it is expected that SSL technology


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