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Workplace


Achieving a truly flexible workplace


More and more, landlords and occupiers are seeking maximum flexibility in the design of the workplace to enable them to maximise the performance of assets. Tony Cahill looks at some of the options and implications


hese days, most occupiers want a workplace that allows them to change, adapt and expand the use of their space without incurring significant further costs to adapt. Likewise, landlords need spaces that can be flexible according to the needs of current and future tenants. For the facilities manager, meeting these objectives can be quite a challenge. To deliver a successful project, the need to consider a wide range of current and predicted future requirements must be balanced with the benefits that the latest technological and workforce trends can bring. An FM cannot be an expert in all of these areas. What the facilities manager brings to the table is a unique in-depth


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understanding of the client, the day- to-day operations of the business, strong client relationships and an understanding of the client’s future needs. So, by forming strong partnerships with experts in areas of workplace design and technology, they will be best placed to fulfil the brief when the call comes.


Workplace design The functional use of the workplace continues to change. Flexible working patterns are increasingly the norm, evolving technology is enabling home- based working for increasing numbers of staff, bring your own device (BYOD) policies are beginning to grow in popularity and overall employee expectations of the


64 FACILITIES


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