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Green FM


authority on corporate responsibility and sustainable development – developed the framework concept of the “triple bottom line” which highlights the social, environmental, and economical benefits of adopting a sustainable approach to create greener business value. This effectively values a business not just on its profit and loss, but on its impact on the environment and its corporate social responsibility credentials. The triple bottom line is an important concept for the smart FM to keep in mind – because small changes that are simple to implement can make a massive difference to it. A recent study* found that only 14 percent of businesses in the UK have a dedicated environmental or CSR team setting company environmental targets so the potential to FM’s to take on the responsibility is clear.


What are the steps you can take to make an impact to the triple bottom line? n Start with engaging with experts – look to outsource environmental and waste services if you don’t have the resource in house


n Improve processes of handling waste and energy costs and reduce the volume of waste by compaction or bailing


n Remove all recyclable items from the waste stream and implement a closed loop recycling system


n Re-use items, and recycle wherever possible


n Assess your energy costs and implement improvements such as solar panels, LED Lighting, sensor lighting systems, wind turbines for bio energy and water saving systems.


Making changes that affect the triple bottom line will in most cases mean going right back to the beginning of the supply chain. Some simple measures to put in place include engaging with the suppliers to reduce waste by using less packaging and recycling the packaging that is used. Returning all metal drums and pallets and buying products in larger containers will also reduce plastic waste. Adding green goals to the list of process to be analysed will result in measureable progress. However, an investment of time and energy is required to see the


best results only achieved by closely analysing operations and measuring performance over the course 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 3 years. It’s estimated that waste typically costs companies 4.5% of their turnover and a survey of more than 1,000 CEOs by PriceWaterHouseCoopers showed that just under 80 percent believe sustainability is critical to the profitability of a company, and whilst facilities management is increasingly characterised by the relationships between suppliers and contractors to achieve greater efficiencies and lower costs – the argument to incorporate sustainability into FM objectives is clear. The importance of sustainability runs through the entire supply chain, buyers from Marks & Spencer for example have an incentive to buy products from suppliers who work towards what the company terms its “silver” factory standard. This involves a scorecard that measures performance in three areas: economic, human resources and community, and ethical conduct. By 2020, M&S would like 75% of food products by volume to come from factories with silver status. Ultimately, the positive results that come from bolstering the triple bottom line are far reaching – economical, social, and environmental, for generations to come. Clearly, facilities managers need to ensure that even sustainable processes are customer focused and in line with overall business objectives – and of course, a firm that uses this approach needs to retain a culture of encouraging and rewarding facilities managers.


Further information


Floorbrite offers waste management and environmental consultation, overseen by Trudie Williams who is ISO 14001 Lead Auditor Accredited and WAMITAB trained (specifically relevant to the waste management industry). The firm delivers Waste


Management through their preferred partners in the industry. Offering a range of services covering trade waste removal, recycling, food waste removal, secure shredding, hazardous waste and diversion from landfill, Floorbrite offers bespoke waste management package with a focus on achieving unique environmental aims. Trudie and her team put together


a programme of dealing with internal and external recycling and can offer baling and compaction equipment on site to reduce your waste footprint before it even travels. Accurate environmental reports can also be produced for your business showing tonnages per month produced by your site and a breakdown of each waste stream. To find out more about Floorbrite, visit www.Floorbrite.co.uk


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