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Energy


Another key development has been controlling the lights and heating/ventilation with one sensor that has two channels, so reducing wasted light but also only having the extractor fans on in a washroom when occupied. The run-on times can be set individually and you can also reduce the fan costs by not needing timer controlled models. For the more sophisticated building management systems


you can use sensors which have built-in thermostats. This system reliably detects the three most important values of a room: the room temperature, the light level on the ceiling which transmits the measured values to two 0-10V interfaces and, thirdly, the sensor detects movement and reports this via a switch contact. This information then can be used for closed (proprietary) BUS-systems (e.g. LON or SPS) and DALI-systems. The real advantage of using a lighting control system compared with a stand-alone lighting control or traditional manual switches is the fact that you can control individual lights or groups of lights from a singleuser interfacedevice. This technology gives you the opportunity to control several light sources from one user device and create complex lighting environments. A room can have various scenes already pre-set, based on the activity in a particular room. A major advantage of using a lighting control system such as this is it can result in a huge reduction in energy consumption. The individual lamps will also have a longer shelf live if dimmers are used and lights go off when not being used. Wireless lighting control systems offer


even more benefits including the reduction of installation costs and more flexibility over where switches and sensors can be placed. Automatic lighting control systems, in summary, can be time dependent (i.e. lights off during breaks and weekends), daylight dependent (for busy working conditions) and presence-dependent (for corridors, staircases and rooms that are seldom used) saving energy and money.


LED’s leading the way


Light-emitting diode (LED) products, due to their significantly increased energy efficiency, have become very popular in a world where energy and resources are growing scarcer and more costly. Although they have been around in one way or another since the early 1960s, it is only in the past decade that LED technology has developed to a point where it has become both practical and economical to use in a wide variety of applications. As LED’s have evolved and improved they have become the lighting solution of choice due to their energy efficiency, long lasting nature, flexibility and good colour quality. The advent of LED technology also brings with it the opportunity to experience exciting new functionality such as colour. Using wireless lighting controls, users will be able to switch, dim, change colour, make group colour settings and more. LED’s use almost 75 per cent less energy and last 25 times longer than incandescent lighting.


The future looks bright


As energy prices continue to increase coupled with ongoing concerns about the environment, organisations across the nation are investing millions to replace out-of-date lighting systems. But the Government could do more to increase uptake. In Denmark, it is mandatory for all Government buildings to be fitted with controls, no ifs and no buts – a MUST! Why can’t the same be set here in the UK? Already described as the low hanging fruit of energy saving by more than one green expert, the future new technologies, products and systems in the lighting industry will create new opportunities to help the environment, end-users, and make significant cost savings. Private-sector interest in these advances has been reinforced by public policy, including more stringent energy policies in UK and beyond. While LED’s play a role in reducing energy consumption across the globe, lighting control systems serve to provide the correct amount of light precisely where and exactly when it is needed. Schools are already experimenting changing the colour of light and the levels in the afternoon to counter circadian rhythms to keep the children more awake to learn. These systems are also starting to be used


to provide more, such as retailers using the technology to push special offers to customers’ smart phones while they browse the store.


Further information


B.E.G. are focused on providing solutions for energy saving, comfort and security. We are a German-owned family business with 40 years in developing, manufacturing and distributing innovative solutions for intelligent building automation. Our product offering includes motion and presence detectors


from standalone through to KNX solutions. We have an unrivalled range of PIR solutions with over 150 different products and can cover all applications, from cold storage through to warehouses. If we do not have your solution then we will look to develop, which is why we introduce new products every year. We operate in 12 European countries with national agents


supporting the other key markets. We sell through electrical wholesalers while providing technical and design support including marked up drawings for the contractors and end users through our knowledgeable and helpful sales staff.


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