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Energy


It’s a technique that has been in


existence for decades. With more and more people seeing the benefits of whole-life cost analysis, its popularity in construction is increasing. Rather than focusing on the cost of instalment and payment for the system, it focuses instead on the building’s requirements, how well each solution tackles them and the costs of doing so. Going cheap might look good in an initial payment. But compare its whole-life cost to that of an energy efficient system, and the difference can be thousands, wasted money that businesses cannot afford to lose. When considering each building’s needs, it shouldn’t be simplified to just simply ‘the building must be heated’, as the full requirements are far more specific. Value management and value engineering are indispensable factors in finding the more efficient solution. The system should match the needs of the occupants, as well as the building’s shape and size. This means knowing exactly where and when heat will be needed and how it can best be delivered. In specifying a heating system, it is important to base requirements on output and functional needs, rather than describing the process by which these will be achieved. This allows for


flexibility and perhaps more thoughtful or innovative approaches to a heating solution, one that will fulfil needs over the system’s life. For example, it should respond to alterations in the work pattern, downsizing or expansion. As an example, an RAF air base in Coltishall has displayed genuine energy saving benefits of this method of heating system. Whereas it previously had a highly inefficient high temperature hot water distribution system, it turned to reducing its extensive fuel consumption. Following an investigation into the options, taking into account whole-life costing, radiant tube heating was found to be the best solution for long-term value. After just a few months of instalment, energy consumption was found to have reduced dramatically. Compared to its previous boiler system, the base saw a 64% reduction in heating costs and a 55% emissions reduction. Over a ten year period following the system’s introduction it was calculated that the base would get discounted savings of near £150,000. This is something that every sector can benefit from. And, with forward thinking companies strongly backing the system, there can be nationwide savings of up to millions of pounds. With fuel prices looking to never back down, it is a saving that no one can afford not to make.





Value management and value


engineering are indispensable factors in


finding the more efficient solution


’ Further information


Please contact Lisa Adams Marketing Communication Executive Telephone: 01384 489 741 Email: lisa.adams@nortek.com www.reznor.co.uk


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