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Energy


There is also a more detailed check available that involves an on-site inspection that tests your pump system’s efficiency using a variety of tools. The data is then used to formulate a report that highlights potential savings and how optimal improvements can be carried out.


Pumps stand out as offering the single biggest savings opportunity We all recognise the pace of technological change over the past 10/15 years has significantly impacted on many aspects of our lives. Looking at the raft of developments, we’ve seen over recent years, we all accept that these advances have, by and large, made the world a better place. Equally, these developments have diversified away from consumer demand for increasingly smart gadgets, into every strata of business - including within the pump industry. A by-product of this has seen the opportunity to not only create pumps that are more efficient in individual operation, but that take this development one-step further. This has resulted in a holistic intelligent design approach that offers the opportunity to integrate devices such as pumps, communication units, controls and protection equipment, transmitters and drives within a pump solution. This means that you can now ensure that the whole system will operate to its maximum effectiveness and efficiency.


Ready to communicate One of the specific ways that taking a more holistic approach to a pump system can manifest itself is demonstrated by new communication platforms that today offer a wide range of important benefits. Some of the reasons behind these changes are because we are seeing demand moving away from a simple pump selection scenario into a much more integrated and systems driven approach that looks at the integration of an entire system. This now means all aspects of pump engineering are becoming much more synergised and the communication abilities ever more sophisticated. This is in effect quite a sea-change for the industry as


the previous focus had been on maximising the inherent engineering to deliver the best energy efficiency on an individual pump basis. Of course the economies of scale offered by being able to interrogate the system better, mean that a focus on energy is certainly an important spin-off of improved communications.


Flexible data communication


More technically advanced pump companies are able to offer a wider and more sophisticated approach. This can be seen for example in remote management systems which are already available on a secure, internet-based platform. Such systems can monitor and manage pump installations in a wide range of applications including industrial processes. What this means is that pumps, sensors, meters and pump controllers are connected to a data logger. Data can then be accessed from an Internet PC, providing an overview of your system. If sensor thresholds are crossed or a pump or controller reports an alarm, a communication will instantly be dispatched to the duty person.


In this way changes in pump performance and energy consumption can be tracked and documented using automatically generated reports and trend graphs. These can also give an indication of wear or damage, and service and maintenance can be planned accordingly.


To ensure that you will get the best system available, this is a checklist of things such systems should ideally be able to support: n achieve a range of fieldbus connectivity protocols that have the approval to the relevantly accredited marques.


n enable data communication via open and interoperable networks.


n deliver a comprehensive range of features and a range of documentation that will support specific demands.


n provide data transparency through motor protection/ drives/sensors for total system optimisation.


n offer a robust additional mobile platform that gives access to data ‘on the go’.


n removes need for additional panels. Remote monitoring


Remote monitoring and control refers to a field of industrial automation that is entering a new era with the development of wireless sensing devices. This was initially limited to SCADA systems, remote monitoring and control and refers to the measurement of disparate devices from a network operations center or control room and the ability to change the operation of these devices from that central office. Today there are other remote monitoring solution management options that offer an efficient and cost effective alternative that can be used in standalone solutions - for example in retro-fit applications; as complimentary to; or in partnership with SCADA systems. This route will often deliver a more cost effective outcome. Such systems have become more accessible with the introduction of cloud based remote monitoring systems.


The future


Pump engineering will continue to improve but in stage steps rather than any radical new developments. This will mean that bigger wins will need to be achieved in other areas – such as improved overall systems design and fully integrated solutions. The answers are out there – you just need to ask the right people the questions.


Further information


Grundfos Pumps Ltd are a UK leader in the supply of pumps and pump systems for domestic, commercial building services and process industry applications, as well as being a major supplier to the water supply and treatment industries and provider of packaged fire sets. They are part of the Grundfos Group that employ 19,000 people in sales and production roles in 83 companies worldwide. Founded in Denmark in 1945, the Group now has an annual turnover of £3billion and produces 16 million pumps per year.


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