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Energy


Making energy efficiency work


Energy consumption is increasingly being understood, but efficiency is the poor relation – often with only simple measures being deployed. Sunil Shah makes the case for a change of focus


W


ork around the issue of consumption helped in recent times by new regulations and


taxes affecting larger organisations where compliance and payments need board-level approval. With this should come the desire to reduce the costs of bills, typically through investment in new technologies, but that’s tended to be a secondary focus at best. Late last year saw COP21 closing with the negotiations supported significantly by the engagement of business in the discussions held over the two-week period, and with a specific day set aside for Buildings. A number of commitments were made for immediate actions and public targets were set that far exceeded the political will. More surprising was the response from the investor community which within a few days saw impacts on fossil fuel and renewable technology companies share prices. There will be a knock-on effect to real estate over the


18 FACILITIES


coming years where the carbon cost will be a risk determinant in asset valuation. With rising global energy prices, the


drivers to reduce energy consumption and become more efficient are self- evident. However, with the increasing costs and regulations in place, the impact of these policies on organisations has been minimal. The Carbon Reduction Commitment (CRC) has delivered little in the way of energy savings in comparison to the revenue, in excess of £650m, generated for the Treasury. There are three main activities captured within the term ‘energy efficiency’ – involving engagement of staff, capture of robust data and analysis of how a building is used to enable a better understanding of how it can operate. Put in other words, this involves: n Education of people n Provision of a monitoring and targeting system, and


n Reduction of energy consumption through an audit programme.


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