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Energy


plans for this critical discipline. EI members have clearly stated their support for energy effi ciency measures within a cohesive, consistent and stable policy framework. They will continue to offer their views and expertise to government through forthcoming consultations and initiatives as a key part of their EI membership.


Where do facilities managers come in?


Process effi ciency is highly dependent on the process itself, but a factor common to many processes is the human element. The ‘people’ factor and behaviour change within industry together were highlighted as one of the most important elements in infl uencing energy use. To achieve greater effi ciency within


the transport sector, members cited electrifi cation (including hybridisation), increased engine effi ciency, behaviour change and improved public transport. Many of these measures were focused on road vehicles, both passenger and freight.


Author information


Sarah Beacock FEI is Skills and Capability Director at the Energy Institute, the leading chartered professional membership body for the energy industry.


www.energyinst.org


Impacts of energy effi ciency A signifi cant and often overlooked factor of implementing energy effi ciency is the positive non-energy impact which can result. Within the industrial sector particularly, energy effi ciency can directly lead to increases in productivity, higher product quality, reduction in labour and materials, improved site environmental quality and reduced equipment downtime. These non-energy benefi ts, along with greater energy security, the potential to reduce and help manage energy demand, and contributions to decarbonisation are emphasised strongly by EI members from across the industry. The coming months will reveal a new direction for the UK’s energy effi ciency strategy as DECC lay out their forward


16 FACILITIES


Little of the above will come as a surprise to FMs. Many already have an energy management role within their organisations and some go on to become fully-fl edged Energy Managers as a separate discipline. Within many businesses, FMs are still the fi rst point of contact for managing the company’s energy use – from lighting, heating, air conditioning to managing company car fl eets and use of fuels. Whether Facilities Manager or Energy Manager, these individuals become vital in the delivering of company-wide energy effi ciency schemes and, in turn, contributing to the UK’s energy policy goals. Depending on the size and complexity of the organisation, a facilities manager will either have a broad knowledge of almost every part of the organisation’s energy use or an in-depth knowledge of specifi c uses. They may be working on their own or as part of a team and will be developing their skills as rapidly as the related technology moves on, if not even quicker. Specialist knowledge is a critical acquisition need for FMs. Not surprisingly then, support and recognition for this fi eld of expertise is growing. There are training courses and qualifi cations for every level of energy management need; those by the EI having been developed for over 20 years. To further recognise this vital role, we are the only professional body licensed to offer the title of Chartered Energy Manager, the pinnacle of achievement for those responsible for energy management in their organisation. It’s available to energy managers, facilities managers, engineers and others who are responsible for energy effi ciency – and provides essential recognition for this crucial role as well as facilitating a strong career path to other energy management roles and frequently into consultancy.


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