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Energy


five percent of members believed investment should be increased across all forms of energy efficiency (in buildings, industrial processes, transport and changing people’s behaviour). Making the electricity grid smarter was also seen as requiring significant additional investment, enabling greater integration of demand-side measures. This trend came from respondents irrespective of the industry sectors in which they work.


The potential of energy efficiency Energy efficiency was also identified by members as one of the best measures to be taken by the 2015-2020 UK Government to make progress towards meeting the UK’s 2050 emission reduction targets. Thinking about the longer term, six in ten members cited energy efficiency as the single best measure to achieve cost-effective decarbonisation by 2030. Again, transport efficiency and related transport infrastructure improvements, as well as energy storage, featured amongst the top-cited measures. EI members were asked to identify


the factors with the greatest potential to reduce UK energy demand by 2018. Almost 60% of respondents thought the greatest short-term gains can be made through higher efficiency in the built environment, including both domestic and commercial properties. This pattern was more prominent for professionals who work in the energy demand sector, with seven in ten suggesting that, in particular, commercial buildings should be the focus of efforts to reduce demand. For all members, building efficiency improvements were closely followed by industrial process and transport efficiencies. The potential of energy efficiency in buildings was further reinforced by members when asked in greater detail about specific areas for efficiency improvements over the next three years. When asked to compare the short-term opportunities for energy efficiency improvements in the building, transport, and industrial process sectors, it was buildings that were emphasised by 49% of EI members, with the other categories fairly even with 26% and 25% respectively. This trend was more pronounced for those working within the demand sector: 59% of


these members singled out buildings as having the greatest potential for improvements over the near-term.


Energy efficiency 101 – where can the biggest wins be achieved? Improving the building fabric was the most frequently mentioned upgrade from EI members, and a combination of technology advancements, retrofit and insulation of existing building stock, along with better management and control systems for energy use were commonly cited ways to reduce the built environment’s energy demand. Retrofitting was emphasised by many members, as new building designs and standards only apply to a small proportion of UK properties, while the existing building stock will be present for decades to come. Building technology upgrades included efficient technologies in heating and lighting, such as heat pumps and LED lighting, and smart energy controls that are usable by non-energy professionals. While there was little variation in the suggestions for building efficiency opportunities, there was wider variety of recommendations for industrial process efficiency measures. Across industrial processes, the three most cited measures were heat recovery, behaviour change and improvements to energy-intensive and high-temperature processes.





Almost 60% of respondents thought the greatest short- term gains can be made through higher efficiency in the built environment, including both domestic and commercial properties


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