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FM in Action





The recognition that strong relationships drive down costs by avoiding waste in managing disputes and failures is slow in coming





they probably are from their perspective: they’ve met their KPIs and feel satisfi ed they have delivered on the SLA that they were contracted to. However, the client doesn’t share the service provider’s view and may actually be far from satisfi ed with the service delivered, ultimately looking to the market to fi nd an alternative. A typical underlying cause is the fact that contract requirements rarely stay static, especially over a medium to long-term agreement; and they aren’t always an accurate depiction in the fi rst place. That’s an all too familiar scenario in this industry. Of course, cost has always been a


signifi cant driver in retendering, and perhaps always will be for some. The recognition that strong relationships drive down costs by avoiding waste in managing disputes and failures is slow in coming and requires research to gain credibility. However, many of us have experience providing anecdotal evidence that doing more with less requires the right people with the right attitudes and behaviours to change the way we assess and deliver on FM priorities. This requires the drive to look more strategically, to seek other measures that defi ne the relationship between the two parties. The BS11000 standard on collaboration is quite relevant here – but even this needs tools to measure and demonstrate the improvements being made.


Author information


Anne Lennox- Martin is Managing Director at business relationship specialists FMP 360.


http://www.fmp360.com/


Flexible, responsive and effective So how can we prove that the proposed 360 process works in different contractual situations and FM business models? In order to focus both the client team and the service delivery team on working together to support the organisation they serve, the process relies on identifying critical success factors –


144 FACILITIES


the factors that will drive effi ciencies in both cost and quality of service. The approach is consultancy-led, with a member of the team acting as a facilitator, ensuring alignment through mediation, monitoring, assessment and suggestions. Using the 360 process, both parties measure each other’s performance each quarter or some other specifi ed period. The results form the basis of a commitment matrix that works to better align their behaviours and contributions to the top-line goals of customer service at the strategic level (the organisation), the business level (departments and/ or teams) and the productivity level (the staff of the organisation). These goals can be changed when necessary, allowing for real-time alignment with what is happening in the business. There may be a merger planned, or perhaps a big move is imminent. Maybe profi ts are down and a strategic drive to reduce costs has been announced. Perhaps the client is thinking of re- tendering or looking at a new FM model, but would rather fi rst evaluate if the existing relationship can be improved, thus saving the cost of retendering and the risk to business continuity that inevitably accompanies a change of supplier. Basically, whatever is ‘hot news’ in the boardroom can be addressed in the assessment process – ensuring a strategic approach to service delivery, rather than a focus on business-as-usual standards. This is closer to a revolution in measurement, rather than evolution. It is dynamic measurement, which sits above the reliance on the contractual SLAs and KPIs in addressing the collaboration and trust agenda being debated throughout the FM industry. It is an approach that can help clients and their service providers at every stage of the FM journey – whether that’s just entering into a new contract, mid-way through or coming to the end and planning the next step. Developed in the real world using real scenarios and contracts, in both the private and public sectors, it is an approach yielding results that demonstrate vast improvement in service delivery and in the underlying critical relationships. Quite simply, it means we can now manage what we couldn’t measure before.


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