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FM in Action


The European CEN TC 348 Committee in turn has also produced a total of 7 standards that have been published to date including: n BS EN 15221-1:2006, Facility management – Terms and definitions


n BS EN 15221-2:2006, Facility management – Guidance on how to prepare facility management agreements


n BS EN 15221-3:2011, Facility management – Guidance on quality in facility management


n BS EN 15221-4:2011, Facility management – Taxonomy, classification and structures in facility management


n BS EN 15221-5:2011, Facility management – Guidance on facility management processes


n BS EN 15221-6:2011, Facility management – Area and space measurement in facility management


n BS EN 15221-7:2012, Facility management – Guidelines for performance benchmarking


More recently, in 2011, a new initiative was launched to establish a new Facilities Management Committee within the International Standards Organisation. The ISO does not normally permit any discipline to establish such a committee and it was only after some considerable effort that they were convinced that FM was both distinctively different and deserving of a committee to bring the good work that had been done within Europe and elsewhere to a wider international community.


ISO standards The volunteers who work within the ISO TC 267 Committee for Facilities Management have been hard at it since 2011. The initial work focused on the first two European standards which were due for review: BS EN 15521-1 and BS EN 15221-2. That review is drawing to a close and the two standards have been edited to reflect a broader international context. They will emerge mid 2016 as ISO 18480-1 Facilities Management – Terms and Definitions and ISO 18480-2 Facilities Management – Guidance on strategic sourcing and the development of agreements.


International reach During the period of this work a very enthusiastic group of people has been formed. A healthy and robust dialog now takes place within the committee to try and ensure that what is produced is both appropriate and applicable to all countries. The following countries have participated to date within ISO TC 267 Facilities Management (as at December 2015): n Austria n Australia n Belgium n China


n Canada n Columbia


n Croatia n Czech Republic n Denmark n Finland n France n Hungary n India n Ireland n Japan


n Israel n Malaysia


n Norway n Poland n Panama n Serbia


n Tanzania n UK


n Germany n Iran n Italy


n Netherlands n Portugal n Singapore


n Slovakia n South Africa n Spain n Sri Lanka n Sweden n Spain n UAE


n Switzerland n Thailand n USA


I think that you will agree that this list reflects an interesting mix of those countries that have already made the commitment to participate and there is no doubt that once the establishment of the committee becomes wider known across the facilities management community others will join.


Management System Standard The most recent initiative that has occurred within ISO TC 267 is the approval to proceed with the development of a ‘Management System Standard’ (MSS) for facilities management. This in itself was a challenge in that ISO as an organisation does not allow an MSS on any topic easily. Part of the reason for this is that an MSS differs from a normal technical standard in that it potentially reaches across all types of organisations and disciplines whilst





The most recent initiative that has occurred within ISO TC 267 is the approval to proceed with the development of a ‘Management System Standard’ (MSS) for facilities management





FACILITIES 139


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