This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Technology


of government services during the course of the current Parliament and then a move towards linking different local and central departments together. Leading the government’s digital revolution is the Ministry of Justice (MOJ) which is catapulting courtrooms across the UK into the digital age. The aim is to make obsolete the 160 million sheets of paper generated by the courts each year. All of this paper information, which needs filing and storing, would if stacked be higher than Mount Everest. Paperless courts are on track to be a reality by 2016. A digital police force is almost becoming a reality as


well. This is to enable it to interact seamlessly with the rest of the criminal justice system. The government claims that so far, through reducing bureaucracy and focusing on digitisation, police productivity has improved and the proportion of officers in frontline roles is up to 91%. The digitisation project is based on ‘open standards’ and aims to create a common IT platform and digital data store for information on cases going through the criminal justice system which will be accessible to all parties involved. The National Health Service is also implementing a digital programme, which is a key part of the efficiency drive. However this has proved more challenging due to the service’s size; it’s made up of 470 organisations and, while some parts are at the forefront of the scanning of medical records, other sections within the organisation are still to decide their specific programmes. Digitising services and eradicating the use of paper in the treatment of patients across all health and care services can only support nurses, midwives and healthcare assistants in their work and help them release time for care. Often, restricted access to paper records can delay operations and not provide essential background information that surgeons and consultants need on a daily basis. In addition, converting paper into digital records that can be remotely accessed from a central location will not only save on the cost of stationery and filing systems but will also reduce the cost of posting documents from one site to another. However ‘paperless’ public organisations with a common digital platform will require total data solutions for the billion bits of critical information from the point of generation to where it’s destroyed at the end of its life cycle. With the average data breach due to inadequate controls costing £2.5million per organisation, it is imperative for budget and security conscious government departments to protect their customer, employee and supplier data with robust controls, using contractors who are suitably experienced and qualified. Documents awaiting scanning, and indeed those records which must be preserved in paper format as a statutory requirement or for historical value, will still require storage. It makes sense to use a secure off-site document management facility that can also provide a scanning service to avoid transport costs and the potential for loss in transit. When choosing a supplier, make Quality Standards such as ISO9001, 14001 and 27001 a requirement and check that the supplier has suitable experience and customer references to meet its obligation. A “joined


up” approach – i.e. using a contractor able to provide the complete range of Document Management services, will often reduce risk and cost, whilst improving efficiency. To help facilitate optimum security arrangements


at storage and shredding centres, they should be staffed by personnel that have been fully vetted and rigorously security checked. Premises should be secure, with access control, CCTV and gated entrance. The current mantra of the Government is that digital will become the default position and this is becoming evident by the provision of more services online. The secret of the success of the Government’s digitisation programme has been the establishment of a common IT network infrastructure, which all government departments must now use. The Government’s decision to go digital is also influencing third party organisations like insurance companies and garages which need access to government data, such as DVLA licensing information, and as a consequence are required to interface with the Government’s new cloud- based platforms. The wider commercial sector is also being influenced by the example that the Government is setting with its digital agenda and many organisations are reviewing their administrative processes to improve access, security, efficiency and profitability. Changes in the way central government is managed are creating new opportunities for the data solutions market. It is companies that have the framework and capacity in place to support the new “digital world” that will have the competitive edge when contracts are awarded.


Author information


Anthony Pearlgood is Managing Director of PHS Data Solutions, a leading player in the scanning, storage and shredding industry for a variety of sectors, including Government, the NHS, pensions, insurance, legal and retail. PHS Data Solutions is a division of the award-winning PHS Group,


which was founded in 1963 and has grown to become a leading workplace provider in Europe, taking care of over 200,000 customers at more than 450,000 locations across the UK, Ireland, Spain and Holland.


FACILITIES 137


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160