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Technology


While, as well as serving as a security measure, building entry systems can help to spot trends in when an office is at its busiest. As can motion sensors, which are typically installed to help monitor when rooms are unoccupied. Big data solutions harness data from these disparate sources, presenting it in one simple-to-navigate platform. Facilities and estate teams can then use this information to accommodate extra people in the office, for example by introducing hot desking and flexible working zones. Not only does this help to provide the right space for different types of employees, it can help to save significant amounts of money on the purchase of new property leases.


One step further Many businesses operate across multiple locations, with offices of varying age and type within their property portfolio. While estate rationalisations are particularly prevalent across the public sector, businesses across all sectors will look at their property estates when trying to identify areas of financial savings. In order to be able to make informed decisions that will help to reduce expenditure without compromising the quality of estates, it is important for facilities managers to have up- to-date information about their properties, such as lease terms and renewal dates, readily available. With many facilities managers


overseeing multiple sites, having such information to hand in an integrated format can help to identify potential cost savings. For example, the ability to compare how often a building is in operation with specific information about the lease, and the other properties nearby, can identify buildings that are due for renewal and no longer operating efficiently. Ultimately, this could support the decision to not renew specific leases in an estate rationalisation strategy.


The advent of mobile technology The method of data capture used can further enhance the value of the information teams have access to, and providing FM teams with mobile technology supports this. For example, security personnel have a very specific function which, while critical,


The six steps to successfully transform data into value


1. Understand What is the end goal? In order to use data effectively it is imperative that you fully understand the strategic objectives of the business and how data can be used to meet these objectives. Who needs the information, when and how often?


2. Locate, simplify and clean Data can be held in multiple, disparate sources and is often out of date. Identify where the data is held, reduce multiple reporting systems and processes, eradicate irrelevant data and then compare. This comparison enables you to identify any conflicts and trends. It’s also vital that one person or team is tasked with keeping the data up-to-date.


3. Integrate Once the data has been cleaned, and is accurate, it needs to be collated. Create a single, simple view of the data by mapping


and overlaying internal and external systems to one central source.


4. Analyse Data is only able to add value once it has been analysed. The knowledge created by examining the information your business holds is what supports strategic improvements.


5. Communicate Communication is key. Present any insights from big data analytics to the decision- makers of the business. Not only is sending the information to the correct stakeholders key, it is also important that the information is presented in an easy to digest format.


6. Act


Aligning insight with the strategic drivers of the business will support change. Not only does this add value, it creates an evidence- based culture of continuous improvement.


can involve long periods of inactivity, particularly during long night shifts. As building patrols already form a key aspect of a security guard’s role, efficiencies can be found in upskilling them to carry out basic maintenance inspections at the same time. By equipping these teams with mobile enabled technology they would be able to log any potential issues – from faulty lighting and damaged equipment, to maintenance issues or lapses in cleaning – on a central system, which can be quickly actioned by the relevant team. There are numerous benefits to this. Not only would maintenance teams receive earlier warnings of issues before they become more severe and expensive, the frequency of daytime inspections could potentially be reduced, and the employee group would become more valuable with an associated rise in their billable rate.


Getting to the end goal


The opportunity that big data analytics presents is clear, and many of the UK retail and financial institutions we have worked with to implement building intelligence solutions have seen significant savings. Yet, in order to achieve this success it is vital that those in charge get the basics right, from the beginning. Only then will the insights that big data holds be able to have a tangible impact on both the FM function and the wider business as a whole.


Further information


The iSite team delivers tailored big data solutions to clients across the private and public sector. With experienced real estate and facilities management professionals on board, the team uses its knowledge and experience to implement solutions that enable organisations to operate their property estates more effectively. As innovators in their field, the


team has developed advanced big data analytics solutions such as HUB. This technology helps businesses drive down costs, increase value and reduce risk. iSite is part of the integrated


property services group, Styles&Wood Plc, meaning clients also have access to a full range of property support services.


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