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Technology


Connecting systems such as this into building owners, managers and facilities management companies’ asset management systems enables greater control, improved service and access to valuable data to create new business models. Spica, for instance, is working with IBM on linking its legionella data with Maximo and Tririga. Companies in this space, innovating connected devices, do not work alone for they combine several technologies from business partners ensuring that the solution delivers best of breed. A good example of this is Photonstar: as Bryan Lawrence explains, its LED lighting has been developed closely with ARM, the chip designer and licensor, using its 32-bit processors, and IBM, using the Bluemix cloud platform. There’s no doubt that the Internet of Things can deliver on its promises, but what of the new business models that can be created – what would they look like?


Author information


Maxwell Segal


has specialised in information technology for 35 years and is now Principal of Segal Technology, working mainly in the facilities management industry.


http://www.maxwellsegal.com/ segal-technology/


What new business models? The ability to inexpensively connect and control assets in a building can enable business models that change asset ownership from capex to opex. This could be where, for example, the FM company delivers asset or monitoring equipment as a service, perhaps on a subscription or pay-per-use pricing model. The collection, storage and analysis of asset data is a valuable tool. And it’s not only valuable for the facilities company collecting the data – such asset insight will be reusable and saleable to others such as construction and fi t-out companies, manufacturers and other FM companies. This is in addition to the value that can be derived by


130 FACILITIES


the data owner for maximising the effi ciency of its maintenance delivery models. The key to monetising this data is to fi rst contextualise it. That is, to understand it and in what context it can be useful, achieved through market innovation and thorough, robust analytics. Once the data owner has contextualised the data, it can then begin building business models around it. It is hard not to overstate the nature of the changes taking place in IT right now. This is particularly true where IoT and Big Data are concerned, for the advent of low- power private area networks and dramatic falls in chip and battery technology prices have made connected devices within the reach of most businesses and across all industry sectors. The situation for facilities management companies and FM individuals is fi rst to understand the technology and then to work out how to embrace and use it. Missing this opportunity will probably consign companies to being a customer of someone who does hold the data and its analytics. To be sure, this data will be needed in order to drive effi ciencies in facilities management companies’ service management models, differentiating them from competitors’ offerings. We started with the big-ask question


of how to drive effi ciencies and improving service delivery. If this is the question, then a viable answer is the Internet of Things and Big Data. This is disruptive technology that will create all manner of new business models that facilities management companies and facilities managers will need to keep abreast of and embrace if they wish to survive and continue to deliver innovative and effective services to their clients.


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