This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Health & Safety


must beware and take into account to properly look after their employees. So how do we arrest this increase in deaths? How do we, as employers and health and safety professionals, continue to work towards the ultimate goal of eradicating workplace death and serious injury? How do we tackle work-related ill health? The answer is multi-dimensional, and for





Psychosocial risk factors have been mooted as potential causes of musculoskeletal disorders and triggers for stress at work


’ 116 FACILITIES


Psychosocial injury is a very real risk to employees, and although it is a topic not yet widely discussed or generally acknowledged in British workplaces, it is gaining more traction and awareness – even the World Health Organisation has recognised the problem as being a worldwide “major challenge to workers’ health and the health of their organisations”. Psychosocial risk factors have been mooted as potential causes of musculoskeletal disorders and triggers for stress at work, which can in turn lead to reduced productivity. High workloads, tight deadlines, lack of control over work and methods are all potential risk factors. The changing economy, which can lead to the threat of redundancy or the introduction of more short-term, less-secure positions is a major factor. Research from the HSE has shown that workplace injuries are higher amongst those with shorter job tenure than their longer employed colleagues. Inexperienced recruits new to a workplace, or in a job for less than six months, are three times more likely to be killed or injured than their experienced workmates who have been in the job for a year or more.


Engendering good practice There is so much that employers


the very best examples the world of work has to offer, you need look no further than RoSPA Health and Safety Award winners. This year sees the RoSPA Awards enter its 60th year. It has become the biggest occupational safety awards scheme in the UK with almost 2,000 entries and 3,500 guests attending ceremonies in three cities. Entries to the awards increase year-on-year, and the reason is not simply that organisations are seeking recognition or reward. The RoSPA Awards help to engender exemplary health and safety practice throughout an organisation; a holder can prove to the working world that they put the safety of their employees above all else. From this comes an improvement in reputation, an enhancement of new business prospects, a boost to employee morale. The benefits of being an award-winner are numerous, which sees more and more applying each year, driving up safety standards. RoSPA Award winners really are the


world leaders in occupational health and safety. It is these organisations that employers must look to for inspiration and guidance on how to introduce and maintain a safety culture that really works.


The ones to emulate Take Brookfield Multiplex Construction Europe Ltd. In 2015 the company was Highly Commended in the Construction Commercial Industry Sector, and named winner of the RoSPA Scotland Trophy – handed out to the best performing organisation based wholly or partly in Scotland – for its South Glasgow University Hospital and Royal Hospital for Sick Children project. The firm was recognised for the implementation of its Back to BASICS initiative, a behavioural safety scheme that takes the basic principles of good management to incorporate


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132  |  Page 133  |  Page 134  |  Page 135  |  Page 136  |  Page 137  |  Page 138  |  Page 139  |  Page 140  |  Page 141  |  Page 142  |  Page 143  |  Page 144  |  Page 145  |  Page 146  |  Page 147  |  Page 148  |  Page 149  |  Page 150  |  Page 151  |  Page 152  |  Page 153  |  Page 154  |  Page 155  |  Page 156  |  Page 157  |  Page 158  |  Page 159  |  Page 160