This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
CEO’s Desk SORGHUM


Fall 2015, Volume 9, Issue 3 NSP Board of Directors


James Born CHAIRMAN, BOOKER, TEXAS Don Bloss VICE CHAIRMAN, PAWNEE CITY, NEB. J.B. Stewart PAST CHAIRMAN, KEYES, OKLAHOMA Dainiel Atkisson STOCKTON, KANSAS Larry Dahlsten LINDSBORG, KANSAS Sam Simmons HARLINGEN, TEXAS Tom Willis LIBERAL, KANSAS Kendall Hodgson LITTLE RIVER, KANSAS Terry Swanson WALSH, COLORADO Blake Tregellas PERRYTON, TEXAS Mike Battin LUBBOCK, TEXAS


NSP Staff


Tim Lust CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER Debra Lloyd OPERATIONS DIRECTOR Chris Cogburn SENIOR POLICY ADVISER Jennifer Blackburn EXTERNAL AFFAIRS DIRECTOR John Duff STRATEGIC BUSINESS DIRECTOR Kelli Fulkerson COMMUNICATIONS DIRECTOR Shelley Heinrich DEVELOPMENT DIRECTOR Shelee Padgett REGIONAL DIRECTOR Jesse McCurry REGIONAL DIRECTOR Sarah Sexton-Bowser REGIONAL DIRECTOR Brent Crafton REGIONAL DIRECTOR Ian Hoeffner INFORMATION DIRECTOR Sybil Caranfa ACCOUNTING ADMINISTRATOR Tobi Heinrich ADMINISTRATIVE ASSISTANT Bruce Maunder RESEARCH ADVISER


National Sorghum Producers


4201 North Interstate 27 Lubbock, Texas 79403 806-749-3478 (phone) 800-658-9808 (toll free) 806-749-9002 (fax) www.SorghumGrowers.com


Sorghum Grower is published by the National Sorghum Producers, an organization that rep- resents U.S. sorghum producers and the sor- ghum industry. NSP is headquartered in Lub- bock, Texas, in the heart of the U.S. Sorghum Belt. The organization serves as the voice of the sorghum industry coast to coast through legislative and regulatory representation and education. To subscribe, make address changes, or inquire about membership or ad- vertising, please call 800-658-9808 or email our office at jennifer@sorghumgrowers.com. © Copyright 2014 National Sorghum Producers


Support NSP, Support Sorghum on the Shelves


A


s fall is upon us and the combines are running across much of the U.S., we were reminded the last few days of October why it is important for growers to support trade associations such


as National Sorghum Producers and political action committees such as the Sorghum PAC and why strong leadership is critical. T e budget agreement was negotiated in an extremely short period of time by a very small group of people and could have totally unrav- eled how crop insurance is managed in this country. While I won’t go into this issue here, I do want to say I am very proud to be a part of the sorghum and agriculture team that worked along with growers like you to make our voices known and to help fi nd a res- olution to the problem. House Agriculture Committee Chairman Michael Conaway certainly came through this fi rst test and showed his strong leadership skills at a critical time. T ere will be more in future issues on this topic. On a completely diff erent note, as you read this magazine, I hope


you enjoy the focus on food. Sorghum has not traditionally stood out in this market, but I am extremely excited about the direction the sor- ghum food industry is headed. While it is not a huge portion of our industry today, it continues to grow rapidly, and I hope you enjoy the content on individual successes in this vastly growing market. Today, it is common for staff discussions to include names like Kellogg’s, General Mills, Panera, Costco and KIND. And while those names are certainly front and center in many discussions today, it is pioneer farmer growers that really took huge risks in the early days to start this industry moving forward. Now, suppliers like NuLife Market, ADM and Ardent Mills are continuing to grow that demand. From Grain Berry, to Bob’s Red Mill products to Wonder Grain, the number of in- store products containing sorghum has exploded. You can read more about these products in Sorghum Shortcuts (page 34). I encourage you to look this winter at all of the options available to consumers today and to help continue to support the growth of this segment of our industry! Taste sorghum.


Tim Lust NSP CEO


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36