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hydraulic supply kit’ we will send you what we recommend you use in your particular application. Bleeding brake-lines is a topic covered


in every other type of publication. One thing to remember is that air will be trapped at the top of any component and must be released by positioning that component so that the air can escape into the hose and be bled out. For this reason it is necessary to bleed the rear caliper for the Sprocket Brake off the axle. Pull the rear axle out enough to remove the caliper (after the brake hose has been attached to the caliper). Put something of equal or greater thickness to the sprocket/rotor (0.350”) between


the pads whilst bleeding. Position the caliper so that the bleed nipple is the highest point of the caliper if bleeding from master-cylinder down, or the lowest point if bleeding from caliper up. We like to put the fluid into the system by ‘syringe’ feeding it in from the caliper up to the master cylinder (with bleed nipple at lowest point). Then we close the bleed nipple and top off the master-cylinder and then bleed in the conventional manner (with the bleed nipple as the highest point). Once you are sure all air is out of the system, reinstall the caliper, tighten the axle nut and install the rear exhaust pipe. The seat is about the only thing left to


permanently install. Seat installation will be self-explanatory once you have the components. When you are ready to take your new


bike for its first ride, travel only a very short distance. Stop and check the bike thoroughly before repeating. Brake rotors and pads will offer poor performance until bedded in. Try to avoid excessive braking force for the first few hundred miles to avoid glazing the brake pads.


WARNING: Motorcycles are dangerous. You take full responsibility for


deciding to assemble your own bike. Seek professional assistance if you are unsure of anything that may affect your safety.


41


COMPLETE BIKE KIT – ASSEMBLING THE BIKE


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