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“This lecture series will bring to the university and the community distinguished scholars and practitioners in the fields of human rights, humanitarianism and genocide studies. The visitors will spend time with UC Davis undergraduates and graduate students taking courses and seminars in the university’s expanding offerings in Human Rights Studies.”


—Keith Watenpaugh Associate Professor and Director of the Human Rights Initiative


HUMAN RIGHTS INITIATIVE


The Humanities Institute has been collaborating with the UC Davis Human Rights Initiative (HRI) since 2011 when it received pivotal seed funding from the Academic Senate’s Committee on Research to initiate a program devoted to the issues of human rights and humanitarianism. The International House in Davis and the HRI formed a partnership in the 2014-2015 academic year to host the Davis Community Human Rights Lectures. These lectures showcased research and ideas about the work of hospital staff in times of crisis, asylum for displaced children, commemoration in Latin America and the politics of genocide denial. According to the HRI director and Associate Professor Keith Watenpaugh, “This lecture series will bring to the university and the community distinguished scholars and practitioners in the fields of human rights, humanitarianism and genocide studies. The visitors will spend time with UC Davis undergraduates and graduate students taking courses and seminars in the university’s expanding offerings in Human Rights Studies.”


ENVIRONMENTS AND SOCIETIES RESEARCH GROUP


The UC Davis Research Initiative “Environments and Societies: History, Literature, and Justice,” one of two inaugural Mellon Research Initiatives launched in 2011, continued its programming in 2014-2015 with the support of the Division of Social Sciences Dean’s Office. The cross-disciplinary collaboration undertook the broad rethinking of human/nature interactions that are critical to meeting the environmental challenges of our era. This year the colloquium featured an assortment of topics pulling disciplines together and producing lively discussion and debate among faculty and students. Topics included queer studies, climate change, utopias, science fiction, wind power, food safety, political theory, and law. Papers on each topic were available for review before participating in the seminar-styled discussions.


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Collaborations


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