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Safe from harm


Making a “secure” city a much more “liveable” city, by Giles K Bailey


C


ities have always been at the centre of much of man’s devel- opment whether it is in culture,


technology or the social rules that allowed us to live in close proxim- ity. And now, the world is urbanis- ing at an increasing rate. Today the most urban global regions are North America, Latin America and the Caribbean with over 80 per cent of the population being urban. Europe is 73 per cent urban, and Africa and Asia are still, narrowly, mostly rural. But these latter two regions are urbanising fast. The future of much of humanity


and much of our economic growth and success will depend on the lives of billions of humans living in the 28 global mega-cities with in excess of 10 million people1


as well as a mul-


titude of smaller cities around the planet. It is of note that much of the growth in urbanisation will be in Africa and Asia, where many of these urban environments are yet to be built and which will numerically be the largest urban region. This region will form the basis for many of humanity’s urban experiences in the future.


Urbanisation has a number of enticing consequences such as wider access to services, culture, personal contact, increasing eco- nomic growth, as well as the poten- tial to allow more of the world to be


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NOTE 1 The Economist – 2014 2 Population Ageing (2008), Oxford Institute of Ageing 3 Internet of Things Installed Base Will Grow to 26 Billion Units By 2020, Gartner, Stamford, Conn., December 2013


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