This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Clockwise from above: Lau’s Zen Garden


dessert; Bonito


(marinated katsuo with datterino


tomato confit); the Tate Dining


Room; Ornament (passion fruit


curd, chocolate snow and tonka bean sorbet)


Today, people are too focused on their paycheck and getting an apartment, because real estate is so expensive in Hong Kong. I want to bring back culture though the experience of food. Food is so much about culture.”


Lau also highlights the passion of female


chefs in Asia. “Females in Asia are generally more adventurous. I see more females working in kitchens, especially in Chinese kitchens. It is a tough work environment, more so than in Western kitchens.” At Tate, the ratio of women to men is 3:1. “My sous chef and my pastry chef are women,” Lau remarks. When asked if she has a female mentor, she says: “French chef Sebastien Lepinoy of Cépage was my mentor. I did not have female mentors. In school, there were a few female chefs, but they were more on the pastry side.”


Story on a plate


For this culinary artist, her food philosophy links the harmony of arts, craft, and space. But for Lau, ingredients are ultimately the key: “For me, ingredients always come first, although a lot of times my dishes may appear at first to be very frou-frou – telling a story with a lot of things on the plate. But taste is always there.”


“I would sacrifice the story for the taste part,” 26


“A lot of times my dishes may appear to be very frou-frou – telling a story with a lot of things on the plate. But taste is always there”


she adds, “but when you have the taste, the story, and the plating aligned together, the results will always be a ‘wow’ dish. That’s the goal.” This stickler for detail also obsesses about her


ingredients. “I try to find some new ingredients, pay attention to the seasons, and see where the ingredients come from. Then, I test many different methods of cooking, try different combinations, focus it into a story, and tell that story on a plate.” “I think you should work with what’s around


you. People’s appetites are strongly affected by the weather.” Lau emphasises the importance using local ingredients: “It’s interesting. Why does cucumber grow so abundantly in India? Because people there need to consume a lot of water because it is so hot. Everything needs to be in harmony. It is important to pay attention and demonstrate respect for those kinds of details.” At the end of the day, what brings Lau most joy is watching people eat her edible stories. “With design, you rarely get that kind of satisfaction. After designing something, you don’t really see someone view your creation. But with food you get that instant gratification. Seeing a person eat, I think: ‘Oh that person is really enjoying it.’ I’m actually creating a memory in that person’s head and that’s really important to me.”


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84