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ADBA R&D Forum 2015 Review


A PERFECT EVENT FOR STIMULATING NEW IDEAS AND COLLABORATIONS


O


ur annual R&D Forum, organised in partnership with the BBSRC NIBB Anaerobic Digestion


Network (ADNet) and supported by the KTN, was a lively and fascinating event which, from the very first session, gave voice to a variety of opinions on priority areas for the sector.


Our Chief Executive, Charlotte Morton, asked the audience to consider how new feedstocks could change the industry, and other speakers really rose to that challenge, including thinking about how algae could be integrated with AD. Charles Banks provided an excellent overview of the ADNet’s different workstreams, while


Chris Goodall of Carbon Commentary delivered some thought-provoking views on the energy market. Chris clearly believes that the electricity market will change over the coming years, making the time at which electricity enters (and is taken off) the network far more critical than it is today. Chris identified a key risk to AD operators in the electricity sector – with increasing levels of solar and wind electricity in the system, will the price of electricity fall, or lose value altogether, at certain times? And could this lead to the end of the baseload Power Purchase Agreements (PPAs) currently popular on the market? Chris asked the AD industry


to reflect on whether more gas storage, battery technology or power-to-gas technology should therefore be considered.


The R&D Forum did not just focus on energy production, however. Many argued that we should be building biorefineries now, with methane for energy just one output, alongside chemicals. Whatever direction the industry takes, delegates were treated to two days of engaging debates, led by real experts in their fields. It’s clear that the UK has a global edge on AD expertise, and the R&D Forum will help us take advantage of that.


www.ttpumps.com


adbioresources.org


JUNE 2015 | AD & BIORESOURCES NEWS


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