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Foreword


INSIDE THIS ISSUE > Foreword:


ADBA News: Regions:


Feature – On-farm AD: Advice Clinic: Training:


Members’ News and Views:


UK AD & Biogas Industry Awards 2015 Preview:


UK AD & Biogas 2015 Preview:


Technology Focus: Pre-treatment technology:


Policy:


Operator & Working Groups: Government & Agency News: R&D Update:


ADBA R&D Forum 2015 Review: Upcoming Events:


Membership Matters: 3


4-6 7


8-13 14


15-19 21 22-26


28-30 32-33 34 35 36 37 39


40-42


ANAEROBIC DIGESTION – A TORY-FRIENDLY RENEWABLE


By Chris Huhne, ADBA’s Strategic Advisor


carbon cuts) and to back cost-effective renewables. There will, however, be an added emphasis on cost-cutting, and a real challenge to the RHI since it is funded from taxes (unlike the FIT, which is funded from energy bills).


A


Although there is a small risk that a UK referendum on EU membership will vote to take Britain out – thereby jettisoning our legally-binding European Union renewables target of 15 per cent of our primary energy consumption by 2020 – both the Prime Minister and the Chancellor want renegotiation to succeed, and our EU membership to continue. In that context, anaerobic digestion is a cost-effective form of renewable energy and of cutting carbon emissions. ADBA will be making a powerful case to this effect in any post-election policy review of the Government’s renewable options.


DECC, though, must take due account of the fact that not all electricity supplies are equal. AD provides dispatchable power – it can either be baseload running all day long, or it can be used to meet peaking demand from consumers. AD is there when it is needed, not just when the wind is blowing or the sun is shining. It therefore does not require a battery or other storage solution, which makes wind or solar more expensive than AD. Thanks to digestate, AD also saves carbon emissions from nitrogen fertiliser.


EDITORIAL:


To be considered for inclusion in a future issue contact: Editor: Kate O’Reilly T +44 (0)7894 039609 E kate.oreilly@adbioresources.org


AD&BIORESOURCES


NEWS FEATURES Features planned for Issue 28 (September) include:


• Making the most of bioresources (including digestate)


• UK AD & Biogas 2015 review • Technology focus: Enzymes, additives and process optimisation Copy deadline: 3 July


Features planned for Issue 29 (November) include:


• Unlocking feedstock • Advice Clinic: On-farm AD • Technology focus: Biogas upgrading Copy deadline: 4 September


SPONSORSHIP AND


ADVERTISING: Jamil Ahad T +44 (0)203 176 4414 E jamil.ahad@adbioresources.org


Rachel Fenton T +44 (0)203 176 5418 E rachel.fenton@adbioresources.org


adbioresources.org


All in all, AD is a particularly cost-effective way of generating low-carbon power and cutting carbon emissions – and that’s before we add in the fact that AD is diversifying the rural economy, and providing jobs in hard-to-reach areas. Add in too that the Conservatives are ruling out on-shore wind because of its English unpopularity, and that AD plants generally create fewer ‘nimby’ protesters than other forms of energy, and we are onto a winner. Now we just have to make the case.


D has little to fear from a Conservative government, since it is arguably one of the most Conservative-friendly renewables. Despite pressure from the Conservative right wing, the party’s manifesto promised both to support the Climate Change Act (which sets out legally-binding


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JUNE 2015 | AD & BIORESOURCES NEWS


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