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18 TECHNICAL PAPER


Lubisol Engineering Company offer a New Type of Refractory Material


LUBISOL #2-SL 1600


Lubisol Engineering Co. is offering a new type of refractory foamed material for high temperature insulation. Lubisol #2-SL 1600 (Supper Light) has a low specific density of 0.3 kg/dm³, a very high working temperature of 1600°C and in the same time a very low thermal conductivity of 0.05 W/m.K at 20°C.


It is supplied as a wet mix of granules, packed in plastic bags, ready for use. The application is done by light ramming.


The new material is very suitable for thermal insulation of glass furnace crowns. When the usual light silica is replaced by the more efficient Lubisol insulation, the heat losses are reduced by about 1000 W/m², bringing fuel savings of 1400 m³/m²/year natural gas.


This material is offered at a competitive price, making possible the large scale application of furnace insulation with maximum efficiency.


High Temperature Insulation


Lubisol Engineering Co. is highly specialised in the production of materials for thermal insulation of industrial furnaces. All materials offered by the company are formulated as a result of own research and development during the last 30 years.


The latest development of the company is a new type of refractory


material for high temperature insulation. Lubisol #2-SL 1600 (Supper Light) has a low specific density of 0.3 kg/dm³, a very high working temperature of 1600°C and very low thermal conductivity: 0.05 W/m.K at 20°C. The thermal conductivity of this material is 3 times lower in comparison with light silica brick used for insulation of glass furnaces.


Lubisol #2-SL 1600 is a high temperature insulating material suitable for application up to 1600°C. Heated at higher temperatures it does not melt, but only starts shrinking. The melting point is over 1700°C.


The material is supplied as a wet mix in the form of granules, packed in plastic bags, ready for use. The application is done by light ramming.


It is important to note, that this material with special properties and high insulating ability is offered at a competitive price, making possible the application of furnace insulation with maximum efficiency. When applied for glass furnace crown insulation the heat losses can be reduced by around 1000 W/m², bringing fuel savings of about 1400 m³/m²/year natural gas.


The new material is very suitable for thermal insulation of all kind of industrial furnaces, kilns and heating appliances.


Heat Loss Reduction and Fuel Savings Calculation Subject for calculation: Upgrading melting crown insulation with the introduction of Lubisol


insulating materials. Crown area 106 m².


Existing insulation: Silica crown Silica sealing


Light silica bricks Insulating coating


450 mm 30 mm


130 mm 50 mm


HEAT LOSSES – 2181 W/m² at 1580°C, based on computer calculation. Outside air t° = 60°C


Upgraded Lubisol insulation: Silica crown


Lubisol Si-Seal


Silica mortar dry powder Light silica bricks Lubisol #2-SL Lubisol #3


450 mm 30 mm 20 mm 64 mm


114 mm 30 mm


HEAT LOSSES – 1193 W/m² at 1580°C, based on computer calculation. Outside air t° = 60°C


Heat loss reduction Q2 – Q1 = 2181 - 1193 = 988 W/m².


To convert W/m² into kcal/m²/h we multiply 988 x 0.86 = 849.68 kcal/ m²/h.


To convert heat loss reduction into fuel savings (gas), we use the following formula:


(Q2 - Q1) x K


Fs(gas) = ____________ 7600


Fs (gas) = fuel savings, m³/m²/h Q2 - Q1 = 849.68 kcal/m²/h K = Coefficient for the efficiency of the burning process - K= 1.66 7600 kcal/kg is the calorific value of the natural gas. Fs (gas) = 0.186 m²/m²/h


For 24 h, Fs (gas) = 0.186 x 24 = 4.464 m³/m²/day, and for 365 days it is:


Fs (gas) = 4.464 x 365 = 1629.36 m³/m²/year.


For 106 m² insulated area Fs (gas) will be 1629.36 x 106 = 172712.16 m³ per year.


The cost of the gas in EU is 0.35 €/m³ and the total cost of the saved fuel will be 172712.16 x 0.35 €/m³ = 60449.26 €/year.


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NOVEMBER 2014 ISSUE


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