This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Motel One M


otel One is a hugely successful German owned hotel brand that launched in 2008. To date there are 47 hotels in the group and in the


UK there will soon be four, two in Edinburgh, one in Manchester, launching in June, and one in the City of London, housed in a modern, new-build multi-storey property designed by Mackay + Partners. It’s an impressive building that has created


a new, contemporary focus on the Minories in the City. It stands out like a beacon against a sea of Portland stone, glass and steel. The property comprises two distinct forms: to the front, a seven storey ‘decorative cube’ and to the rear a 16 storey glass tower. According to the architects, Mackay + Partners, the use of a solid surface material was seen as a new innovative and interactive approach to cladding typology in that end of the City. The City of London planners


embraced the idea of exploring new materials, giving full support to the etched Corian rain screen cladding with changing LED internal lighting. The etch and use of LED lighting behind the facade has allowed the building to be ‘colour wheel’ changed using a computer controlled dimming system, so the building colour changes gradually from dusk to midnight. The unitised glazed rear tower element is set in colour contrast to the front white Corian cube. This contrast allows for the height change and the high level set-backs that screen the double height plant room at roof level. The facade is punctuated with inset flush LED strips that break up the ‘bulk’ of the tower at night. It’s fairly obvious why the brand has become


such a success and so quickly. There are very few hotels of its kind existing in the budget sector. The concept is summarised as, in their words, Budget-Boutique. The budget part of this statement is plain to see; Motel One offers great value for money. The hotel operates simply


GS Magazine 27


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56