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Rocky Mountaineer’s domed dining car, left, and its kitchen, right


The Eastern & Oriental Express on its journey to Kuala Lumpur


recovery is hard to gauge. But for travellers seeking such scenic vistas and cultural experiences, cuisine is integral to the experience. And the rail companies recognise this.


Gold Leaf passengers aboard Rocky Mountaineer’s elegant domed dining car enjoy pointedly local fare, such as Alberta bison or baked wild British Columbia salmon glazed with maple and ginseng, while enjoying the stunning panoramas of the Canadian Rockies. Silver Leaf passengers are served at


their seats. Here, dishes such as braised Alberta beef short ribs simmered in Okanagan Valley Merlot and spices may be pre-prepared and re-thermed, but this isn’t pre-packed plates airline style. Guests have complete control over portion size, food selection and seasoning.


In a very tight space Two executive chefs, Jean-Pierre Guérin and Frederic Couton, are responsible for the menus which have to be prepared on board. “It’s a tight space, considering the works of art the team produces, but our chefs are masters,” says Jeff Pelletier, communications specialist for Rocky Mountaineer. “Dining is one of the pillars we rely on to provide


extraordinary experiences for our guests.”


In South-East Asia, the Eastern & Oriental Express is the first train to transport passengers direct from Singapore and Kuala Lumpur to Bangkok, a journey of 1,262 miles (2,030km). They travel in luxurious comfort so dining is no less luxurious. Executive chef Yannis Martineau designs menus that not only incorporate local ingredients, but also bring the cuisines of Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore and Hong Kong to the fore. For example, braised beef cheeks are prepared with the herbs used for bak kut teh, a classic Singapore and Malaysian dish. And in an extraordinary fusion of cultures, medallion of lamb in a jus of Asian spices comes with fruit-scented couscous and vegetable tian. “The chef doesn’t use pre-prepared


food. The meals are prepared onboard with refrigerated fresh ingredients,” explains Kari Van Treuren,


communications specialist for Belmond, the parent company.


“The chef tries to incorporate local ingredients whenever possible. The meals are included in the booking price of the journeys, so they are value-added for our guests.”


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