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THE BRIDGE TO THE KITCHEN


Parry is now on a course that allows it to regularly identify bottlenecks and highlight constraints on the manufacturing process, which allows it to refine how tasks are planned. Another company that has been through a similar process is now bringing Lean to its customers more directly. Manitowoc Foodservice’s ‘food inspiring kitchens’ – or fitKitchens – initiative is an approach that leverages its expertise in food, beverages, people and equipment to help its clients reduce labour costs, increase sales and revenue, keep menus fresh and maximise efficiency throughout the value chain. “We implemented Lean on our manufacturing lines years ago and it has many benefits,” says Paul Hanniffy director of innovation. “It has inspired efficiency and reduced our cost of goods sold. Lean is a core principle of our global manufacturing team.


“If you look at the commercial kitchen holistically there is a flow from receiving goods to storage to preparation to service to waste disposal. We can find ways to improve that flow. We are not playing the role of designer, but we are helping the design team find the technology to reduce costs and increase


all processes that contribute to overall performance. Parry Group director Mark Banton, for instance, understands well the value of management-led commitment to Lean principles. His company is one of the UK’s largest manufacturers of catering goods and it began its Lean journey at its factory in Derbyshire in 2012. Within two years the company had implemented an extensive programme of change that addressed everything from new manufacturing management, CRM and ERP solutions to driving changes in management control to instil a culture of continuous improvement. The company defined KPIs and conducted value stream mapping to define targets and practical process controls. 5S projects have been completed in its factory, warehouse and offices.


“Our continuous improvement initiatives target what we must do to be right first time and sustain it. It is a cultural shift that can drive exponential change and it becomes self-sustaining when you have tangible gains. Culture is the most important element of Lean. The core of it is getting people to constantly ask if the things they are doing add value,” says Banton. “Everything you need to use for a manufacturing process must be at hand. For example, if building a cooker then you should not even need to take one step to pick up the tool or part you need. There is a big focus on keeping it simple, sustainable and right first time. Everyone is engaged in continuous improvement. We make it clear what people’s roles are and there must be no slipping back to legacy behaviours,” he adds.


“We implemented Lean on our manufacturing lines many years ago and it has had many benefits. It has inspired efficiency in manufacturing”


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