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THE FCSI INTERVIEW


prioritise and understand what you bring to a project and where that can have the greatest effect,” he says. “The other important thing, of course, is luck. A lot comes down to being in the right place at the right time. For example, in the early 1980s I did a lot of work on projects for the health service and local government. On one of the many projects I did back then I asked where the client had got my name and I was told that it came through the Management Consultancies Association, so I found out about how to get membership of that organisation. That is partly why we ended up in a merger with Deloitte,” he adds. It is clear that this event showed to Cade the importance of industry bodies not only as a source of accreditation, but also as a way to connect with skilled people and find interesting new projects. His experience with the FCSI has confirmed this. “The FCSI is very useful. Many foodservice consultancies employ between one and five people but through the FCSI they can access important training, for example, and work on cross-border


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


projects with the assurance that the work will be of the standard that the industry body sets,” he says. “I joined in 1983 and in 1989 I became part of the European board. Within 10 years I was elected president, and I am very proud to have been the first president from outside North America. Around 90% of the members are from North America, so it was really an honour to be chosen. I am proud of some of the things I achieved at FCSI, not least the initiative to get more young consultants involved. When I was president it was the case that many companies did not encourage employees to join, but there has been real progress on that front.” As Cade prepares to enjoy his retirement in the small town of Berkhamsted in England’s Chiltern Hills he has some parting words for consultants who are just setting out on their career path. “Always pay attention to detail. Don’t rush and always have a clear strategy in place. Learn how to communicate clearly and take every opportunity to network. You can’t live in a cocoon.”


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