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INTELLIGENCE


Staff at Bangi Golf Resort, Kuala Lumpur with the new warewashing machine


VIEW FROM THE MANUFACTURER


Washing up in Southeast Asia


The demand for single-task equipment in kitchens in Southeast Asia is increasing. Even areas such as pot washing come into the spotlight as food safety, space, reliability and environmental issues become hot topics, reports Cecilia Carlsten


Food safety The Southeast Asian region has an increasing number of large central kitchens, which enable catering companies to deliver many thousands of meals a day. The need to ensure food safety is high and by using warewash-dedicated equipment there is the opportunity to secure the chain from the start with continuous hygienic washing results. A machine with high wash and rinse temperatures will deliver a much higher level of hygiene than a manual pot wash set-up, where sink temperatures are around 40°C and scrubbing is done by hand.


Reliability


Staff who are willing to work in humid, uncomfortable working conditions are getting harder to come by, causing their salaries to rise. Business owners have to pay more,


Expensive space is best used for revenue-generation


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but can’t rely on a constant good washing result for pots and pans. This affects the overall performance of the operation. In these changing times, businesses need to adapt and they are increasingly turning to efficient, modern machines for pot washing. It’s becoming an attractive solution to the problem of having to find new staff every other week.


Space and environment A growing economy and more businesses fighting over the same area pushes up property prices. Expensive space that costs more per square metre is best used for revenue- generation, rather than tasks such as pot washing, which makes a compact alternative more attractive. Replacing a manual set-up with a machine will always reduce the number of sinks needed, but after a little research you’ll discover that, with the right method, you can discard one if not all sinks. For every sink eliminated, you’ll see dramatic savings in water, energy and chemicals – which is beneficial


The kitchens at Bangi Golf Resort


prepare up to 200,000 meals per year


Cecilia Carlsten is product manager for Granuldisk


Manual pot


washing uses temperatures of 40o


C


making it less hygenic than warewashing machines


both from an economic and an environmental perspective. To put this in context, early adopters of my own company Granuldisk’s warewashing system have praised us for the convenience and ease of use such a solution offers. One early Asian adopter of our “no prewashing technology” is Soh Chung-Ky, kitchen manager at Bangi Golf Resort, Kuala Lumpur. After getting his first pot-washer into operation, he immediately wanted further units to cope with future demands. With up to 200,000 meals per year to prepare and plans to expand, he is feeling the advantages. “The convenience and ease of operation allows my chefs to wash dirty pans themselves as soon as they are done with them and turn them around for immediate reuse,” he says.


In conclusion, I would argue that


Southeast Asia is highly prepared for single task-dedicated equipment, with efficient pot-washing perhaps the most important area due to the attention on waste it offers. As a bonus, replacing manpower with machines often comes with environmental savings, resulting in more sustainable operations. This in turn is attractive from a governmental point of view and, in certain markets, grounds for receiving contributions and funding.


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


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