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THE INTELLIGENCE


Yoga and business: a mix that brings harmony to Jonn Close’s life


Work-life balance IN MY VIEW


Jonn Close FCSI of Close Encounters Trading Network Pty Ltd (CETN) in New South Wales, Australia, reveals how he balances the yin and yang of his life and career


QWhat foodservice projects are you currently working on with CETN?


AMuch of the work we undertake is confidential. Our work as MAS


consultants (operational and business consulting) covers small businesses to multinationals including corporate, government, institutions, cafe, restaurants, and bars specialising in food.


CETN is licensed as a real estate agent and provides advice in leasing and related matters. We undertake tenders, expression of interests for projects and related advice. We also offer expert reports/advice for litigation and economic loss court related matters, provide exit strategies and advice on negotiations and mediation.


QWhat do you enjoy most about your profession?


AThe diversity of the industry and range of projects provide constant


stimulation. I also enjoy being able to give back to the industry that I have been involved in since the age of 12.


QWhat does being an FCSI mean to you? Why is it important?


AI am a board member of the FCSI Educational Foundation (EF) and


believe the future of the industry is in the education of others – from youth to mature industry professionals. Collaboration on projects is the future of the industry based on each consultant’s area of expertise.


For more go to foodserviceconsultant.org


QWhat do you think are the biggest challenges FCSI members face now?


AFear is the root of all challenges in the industry with the introduction


of technology, along with design-and- build companies, chefs, unqualified and uninsured individuals and architects trying to work in areas that are not their area of expertise. This places pressure on professional foodservice consultants to compete. The trend is worse in harsher economic climates as people look for ways to infiltrate new areas and supplement traditional revenue streams. Foodservice consultants are specialists, so there’s no need for fear. They must demonstrate the service that an FCSI consultant provides and the superior value to the client.


I also believe consultants need to disconnect from work and recharge to be effective, maintaining good health and a successful business.


QWhat are your goals for the rest of this year?


AMy plan is to continue to deliver on expectations to


our clients and work with the EF to further develop the education of our industry for long-term sustainability.


QWhat are the proudest achievements of your career/life?


AMy passions are food, people and the ability to help others in my career. I have


been in business for more than 26 years from operations to a successful CETN consulting company of 13 years. The industry feeds my passion and drives me to share my industry knowledge. I have two successful adult children, who have developed an amazing work ethic from an early age. I think it comes from being immersed in the world of self-employed parents running restaurants and catering operations.


I am also proud to have served on industry boards and community projects.


QWhat interests do you have away from the office?


AAn accident in 2008 left me with a 15% permanent impairment to


my body. I regained most of this with rehabilitation and yoga, even though I was told it would never happen. I studied to be a yoga teacher and run the yoga studio in harmony with my consulting business, balancing the yin and yang of different worlds. I travel, cook, entertain and have an interest in outdoor activities.


15


DAN MURRELL


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