This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Is collaboration the solution to getting more people active?


Apple, the world’s largest company, has decided to enter our playground; how will we react?


Will we welcome them or ignore them and tell them we do not want to play with them?


If we don’t play with them, how will they respond?


These were some of the interesting questions on the lips of delegates at the recent IHRSA Convention in Los Angeles and as we wait for the launch of the Apple Watch it was clear that opinion is still very much divided on the impact that Apple’s latest product will have on our industry.


But there are already more than 900 apps on the market that can manage and track our health & fitness activities, so what difference will another one make? The difference is simple – it’s Apple! They transformed the computer world, then the music world, then phones and credit cards and with the integrated fitness apps within the new watch they will soon be making a significant impact in health & fitness and we need to start preparing ourselves.


Ted Vickey, former White House Athletic Center Executive Director, hi-lighted how technology changed the music industry, putting many record stores out of business and asked whether health and fitness clubs might experience the same fate.


“The next decade is going to be a transformational time for this industry”


Meanwhile Paul Lockington, Business Development Manager with Garmin suggested that “something in the psyche of people tells them that working out outside is enjoyable” and suppliers have started to recognise this with the development of new services to cater for an anticipated growth in this area. So the question was asked whether the ‘bricks and mortar’ model of health and fitness has had its day. That may be a bit of a stretch but according to Bryan O’Rourke, President of the Fitness Industry Technology Council (FIT-C) “The next decade is going to be a transformational time for this industry” and he suggests that “If we (the fitness industry) do not start to collaborate we will suffer”.


The message of collaboration is echoed by Kevin Hewitt, CEO of Running Unlimited P67. But is this the only option available to the industry? Magnus Lindkvist suggests not and reminds us that sometimes if we look backwards, rather than forwards we will find ‘old’ ideas which didn’t necessarily make it first time round simply because the world was not ready for them but may be ready to accept these ideas now (P15).


Finally, while the technology firms race to find the solutions to the world’s health challenges, we close out this issue with a reminder from Nigel Wallace that if we wish to engage with the health sector then as an industry we need to raise our professional bar (P70).


As always we welcome your feedback.


Andrew Hammond, Editor in Chief


bodyLIFE_UK bodylifeUK


www.body-life.uk


body LIFE 2 I 2015 I 3


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72