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II: HER WORDS • Culture & Music KTRM Radio / Truman State


This Week in Music History On St. Patty’s day, 1957,Elvis Presley bought the now famous Memphis


mansion that that would come to be known as Graceland to fans of the king of Rock and Roll. Presley lived in his Tennessee home for the better part of his career until he was found dead by his girlfriend,Ginger Alden, twenty years after purchasing the estate. Presley’s deteriorating health due to drug abuse was widely acknowledged by his fans and thousands of them flooded Graceland during an open casket service. When Elvis bought Graceland, the Rock and Roll fever was just


beginning its up-rise and the star’s more humble family neighborhood was becoming overwhelmingly populated by rabid fans. Elvis began appearing on national television in his initial commercial breakout, causing quite a controversy with his sexual dance moves and liberal viewpoints. The “Leave it to Beaver”- ness of the 50’s had fathers and housewives terrified of the new sex symbol their children were listening to and watching. Elvis Presley changed the face of music and popular culture alike with his


influential musical and performance style and his prolific acting career. The three-time Grammy winner and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee is still loved, mourned and impersonated all over the world. His Tennessee home his now a national historical landmark and one of the most visited private homes in the country. Graceland still gets more than 600,000 visitors and year touring the grounds where the king lived for his formidable years and paying respects to the on-site grave in which he is buried.


This Week In Music History AC/DC is recognized as one of the most prolific and


respected band in Rock and Roll history. They began their rise to fame on February 17, 1975 with the Australian release of their debut album High Voltage. The band’s first effort was a good one, selling 350000 albums—a strong number for an album that was only released in Australia. The international version was not released until a year later. Bon Scott, the band’s original front man, lead vocalist


and co-songwriter, was a major reason for their success and is considered one of the greatest in music history. Five years after the release of their debut album—almost to the day—and in


the midst of their rise to international fame, Scott was found dead in the car of a friend. February 19, 1980 nearly marked the end of the renowned band. Had the group disbanded, they wouldn’t have gone on to make nine more albums and eventually be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame as the fifth best- selling band of all time. Instead, the band decided to look for a new front man. They found one in Brian Johnson, who


rounded out songwriting and helped them finishBack in Black, the album they were in the midst of when they lost Scott. The group enjoyed years of success and became one of the most recognizable names in music. Since 2011, AC/DC has talked about the possibility of continuing to add to their prolific repertoire with a modern tour or a new album. Given their standing in the music community, there is no doubt that people would be listening.


— Mackenzie McDermott


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