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Vaccinations | Mothers & Babies


Mothers & Babies | Vaccinations


Dr. Chris advises While a severe allergic to


reaction to any vaccination is rare, it can happen. However, anaphylaxis usually occurs within a few minutes or the jab and the person who has administered the vaccination is trained to deal with anaphylactic reactions.


duties you are looking forward to the least. However, vaccination is a vital step in protecting your child from an array of grave and potentially fatal illnesses. Once your baby has been vaccinated, their body is able to fight against that disease more effectively. However, if a child is not vaccinated, they have a greater risk of catching the infection.


A


Getting Started The NHS recommends that babies


begin their course of vaccinations at two months of age, as babies—like the rest of us—can pick up diseases at any time. The two-month mark is an ideal point to start vaccinations as the natural immunity inherited from the mother is beginning to wear off, and any vaccinations administered before this time may be prevented from working by the baby’s natural immune system. To be on the safe side, it is best to ensure your child has their vaccinations at the correct times to ensure that they are fully protected. To learn which vaccinations


your baby needs and at what times, check the NHS’s recommended baby vaccination schedule:


98 DEAR DOCTOR WITH DR CHRIS STEELE


s a new mother or father, taking your baby for its vaccinations is probably one of the parental


LOOK SHARP


While the sharp sting of an injection may be unpleasant for babies and toddlers, vaccinations enable your child’s immune system to put up an effective barrier against many diseases.


2 MONTHS


DR CHRIS’S VACCINE CHECKLIST 3 MONTHS


5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine This jab comprises vaccines to guard your child against diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough (pertussis), polio and Haemophilus influenzae type b, which is known as Hib. Hib is an infection that can lead to pneumonia or meningitis in young children. It is administered in


several doses.


Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, first dose Rotavirus vaccine, first dose


3 MONTHS


5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, second dose Meningitis C Rotavirus vaccine, second dose





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Separating Fact from Fiction h There are a number of myths


and misunderstandings concerning vaccinations, so it is important for parents to get their facts right. h It is a fact that the injection should be postponed if your child has a fever when they are due to receive it. h It is a myth that you should avoid or delay baby’s vaccinations if they were born prematurely. h It is a fact that your child should not have a vaccination if they have previously had a severe allergic reaction to a vaccination containing


the same ingredient. h It is a myth that vaccinations can run the risk of overloading your baby’s immune system. Only a miniscule proportion of your child’s immune system is used up by childhood vaccinations. h It is a fact that your child should not receive a live vaccine if they have a weakened immune system due to certain medications or some cancer treatments. If you are unsure whether your child’s immune system is strong enough, talk it over with your GP. 


celebrityangels.co.uk


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5-in-1 (DTaP/IPV/Hib) vaccine, third dose


Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, second dose


12-13 MONTHS


Hib/ Meningitus C booster This single injection comprises your baby’s second dose of meningitis C


vaccine and the fourth dose of Hib. Measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) vaccine Pneumococcal (PCV) vaccine, third dose


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