This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
Your Health & Fitness | Fertility and Infertility


IVF, ‘In Vitro Fertilisation,’ is when your eggs are retrieved and fertilised in a laboratory using semen from your partner or a donor. The resulting embryos are then transferred into your uterus to begin growing as in a natural pregnancy. You may be off ered IVF if your fallopian tubes are damaged or blocked, if your cause of infertility is unexplained, or in some cases of male factor infertility. Your consultant will decide if IVF is the right option for you which gives you the best chance of success, based on your screening tests and diagnosis.


In a typical IVF cycle, there


an egg to travel to the womb.  Some medications and drug treatments, including non-steroidal anti-infl ammatory drugs and chemotherapy, can have an adverse affect on a woman’s fertility. Illegal drugs like cannabis and cocaine can also seriously affect a woman’s monthly cycle.  Age is often linked to infertility in women, and the biggest decrease in fertility begins in the mid-30s. 


celebrityangels.co.uk


are fi ve main stages for the IVF process—egg production, monitoring egg production, egg retrieval, insemination and embryo transfer. A typical IVF cycle can be completed in around four weeks. 1. Egg Production: Your ovaries are stimulated with drugs, which you usually self-administer at home, to produce mature eggs. Your dose is tailored depending on your requirements and response to the medications. 2. Monitoring Egg Production: You have regular blood tests and ultrasound scans to monitor your egg production to help minimise any risk of Ovarian Hyperstimulation Syndrome (OHSS), where the ovaries produce too many eggs. It typically takes 10-12 days from the start of stimulation until you’re ready to undergo egg retrieval. 3. Egg Retrieval: When your eggs are ready for collection, they are retrieved via a short procedure at your clinic, which is performed under sedation. You’ll be told how


ALL ABOUT IVF


Do you need IVF? It’s one of the most common infertility


treatments, but why would you need it, and how does it work? Dr Debbie Falconer, Lead Embryologist, Manchester Fertility, gives some answers.


many eggs you have available for your IVF cycle straight away. 4. Insemination: Your eggs are


mixed with your partner’s sperm (or a donor’s), and are then


incubated overnight and


checked the next morning for signs of fertilisation. If any of the eggs have fertilised, they are now embryos and continue to grow in the laboratory incubator. Your date for your embryo transfer will depend on the number and quality of your embryos. 5. Embryo Transfer: The best quality embryo will then be transferred back into your uterus, in a simple procedure that usually does not need any anaesthesia. Any remaining embryos not being used during your cycle can be frozen for future use. Approximately two weeks after embryo transfer, you will be able to do a home pregnancy test. If it’s positive, you undergo an ultrasound scan at around seven weeks, to monitor the pregnancy and see if there is a heartbeat. If all looks well, you are then referred to your GP and your care continues from there. If your test is negative, you will be off ered a follow-up with your fertility consultant, where your treatment will be reviewed and next steps planned. During your IVF cycle, your clinic should also off er you counselling. Counselling is one of the most important aspects of infertility treatment. Some couples need only one cycle of IVF to have a child, others need more, and for some it may not work at all. So it’s important that you—and your partner—have access to trained counsellors who can provide you with much needed, confi dential support.


DEAR DOCTOR WITH DR CHRIS STEELE 89


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116  |  Page 117  |  Page 118  |  Page 119  |  Page 120  |  Page 121  |  Page 122  |  Page 123  |  Page 124  |  Page 125  |  Page 126  |  Page 127  |  Page 128  |  Page 129  |  Page 130  |  Page 131  |  Page 132