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Life Starts at 60 | Mobility STEERING AIDS


A tetra driving aid enables the user to turn the steering wheel by using their wrist, while a steering wheel ball enables safe one-handed steering.


Maintaining Mobility


If you suff er from a disability or are challenged by mobility limitations, there is no reason to let it impede your day-to-day life.


S


uffering from a condition such as arthritis, back or spinal troubles or leg, knee and hip problems shouldn’t


impede your ability to get out and about unaided. Whatever your needs and budget,


there are plenty of options available, from Wheelchair Accessible Vehicles (WAVs) to mobility scooters and powered wheelchairs. These allow disabled people to claim back their freedom to get to work, meet up with friends and enjoy day trips, ensuring they are able to enjoy the independence that most of us take for granted.


celebrityangels.co.uk


GETTING A NEW CAR Cars featuring specifi c adaptations to aid mobility are a great help to many people. The adaptations depend on the type of disability, but some of the most popular additions include automatic transmission, hand controls, pedal modifi cations and steering wheel balls. Many cars can also be customised with a lift for scooters and powered wheelchairs.


INFA RED HAND CONTROLS This enables the driver to operate a vehicle’s secondary functions, including indicators and hazard lights, horn, windscreen wipers and washers, headlights and fog lights, all at the touch of a button.


QUICK RELEASE PEDAL GUARD These stop accidental use of the brake or accelerator pedals and prevent feet or prosthetic limbs from becoming trapped underneath.


PUSH/PULL HAND CONTROLS These are specially designed for those who are unable to operate the foot pedals in automatic vehicles. The controls allow the driver to accelerate, pull the handle towards you, to decelerate, release the handle, and push the handle away to brake.


THE MOTABILITY SCHEME Purchasing a new car or adding adaptations to an old vehicle is a costly process, as is the choice to buy either a mobility scooter or powered wheelchair. Although these are essential items for increased mobility, many may be put off by the price. However, fortunately, there are aff ordable options to suit almost any budget. One of these options is the Motability Scheme, which has helped many people with a diverse range of disabilities to lease a new car, mobility scooter or powered wheelchair, using their government funded mobility allowance. To learn more about the Motability


Scheme visit www.motability.co.uk


Get around with the Rascal Ultralite 480


Voted ‘Best Buy’ in the Mobility Scooter Review 2014 by Which? Magazine, this compact 4 mph, transportable scooter has a proven reputation for outstanding design and reliability. Easy to transport, it can be dismantled in seconds; no cables to worry about, just quick-release locks, convenient lifting handles and lightweight manageable components.


Easy to stow, it can be stored vertically in your home if space is an issue, and fi ts easily into the boot of a car. Maximum carrying capacity up to 18 stone and battery range up to eight miles. Choice of three attractive colours: black, red or teal. The Ultralite 480 is available through the Motability scheme. Freephone 0800 252 614 for your nearest Retailer. Quote: DearDr Visit electricmobility.co.uk


DEAR DOCTOR WITH DR CHRIS STEELE 117


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