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Promotion


To get 20% off your Bowel, Ulcer and Gluten intolerance test pack, go to www.1sthealthproducts.co.uk and quote: DearDr15. Offer Ends 31st March 2015.


Why you need a stomach


and bowel “MOT” SELFCheck are offering a triple health screening package* comprising:


Bowel Health Bowel cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the UK behind breast, lung and prostate cancers. There is a marked increase in the incidence of bowel cancer between age 40 and 50, and age specific incidence rates increase in each succeeding decade thereaſter. 80 percent of bowel cancers are diagnosed in people aged 60 or older. Potential precursors include polyps or adenomas


that can develop into cancer over time, indeed, adenomas are relatively common but only a small number become cancerous. Other chronic conditions such as ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease and diabetes may increase the risk of bowel cancer.


Why is this test important to me? The majority of cases of bowel cancer result from benign tumours called polyps that develop inside the colon. This also means that this type of cancer can be prevented by early diagnosis and intervention. Polyps in the colon can remain undetected for many years until they develop into a cancerous form, and if a polyp is found and removed, it can halt the development of cancer. Early detection is therefore extremely important and anyone over age 40 should consider an annual faecal occult blood test in order to minimise their risk.


Coeliac disease Coeliac disease is a genetic immune disease and can occur at any age, with most sufferers being diagnosed between the ages of 30 and 45. The disease is caused by the immune system’s reaction to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley. Coeliac disease is difficult to diagnose as the symptoms are wide-ranging and episodic, but leſt untreated it can cause serious chronic muscle wastage and other related medical conditions.


*For more see: www.1sthealthproducts.co.uk or call us on 01580 212758


Stomach Ulcer screening test It is estimated that over half of the world’s population may be infected by the stomach bacteria “Helicobacter pylori”. H.pylori causes conditions such as gastritis and ulcers. Untreated long-term infections may cause serious damage to the mucous membrane of the stomach and prolonged colonisation of the stomach may increase the risk of ulcers and stomach cancer. However, a course of treatment with antibiotics will usually eliminate the infection.


How the screening test works The Coeliac and stomach ulcer tests require a small finger prick sample of whole blood. The results of the tests are read visually in under 10 minutes. A single use finger prick device and detailed instructions are supplied. The bowel health test involves taking a small stool sample and provides a visual result in under 10 minutes. Detailed instructions are supplied.


Other screening tests available include Urinary Tract Infection, Drugs of Abuse and female Chlamydia screening tests. Visit 1sthealthProducts.co.uk, or send your enquiry to enquiries@ firsthealthproducts.co.uk.


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