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FEATURE ❘ HEALTH AND FITNESS


KNEE RELATED PAIN - ILIOTIBIAL BAND FRICTION SYNDROME (ITBFS): Cyclists will develop pain on the outside aspect of their knee around the knee cap and over the joint line, caused by a Friction effect of the Iliotibial Band (a strong connective tissue) rubbing the Bursal structures (small fluid filled sacs) that sit between the Iliotibial Band and the Bone. This is caused by the knee being at the wrong angle - it needs to be in no less than 30° of knee flexion at bottom dead centre (pedal position). At YourPhysioPlan. com we would measure your joint position and adjust your seat height and cleat position, to ensure this angle is avoided, with most riders finding it most comfortable to have their cleat rotated to a natural toe out position, normally with their heal just clipping the crank on each pedal stroke.


Other Cycling Related Back Pain – Mid Back and Shoulder Blade Pain: The ‘On-Bike’ posture of the shoulder and hips being at 90° in relation to the trunk causes postural fatigue through the Thoracic (Mid-Back) region as sustaining this posture requires both flexibility and stability. In order for the Cyclist to produce power in this position they are required to be able to dissociate their hips while maintaining a stable core through pelvis and trunk. YourPhysioPlan. com Physiotherapists can aid this with core stability training and scapular strengthening exercise to prevent neck and mid-back pain, while helping to maximise performance by producing a strong trunk to drive the hips from. Stretches: The following stretches should be performed 3-5 times per week as a preventative measure as cycling will cause adaptive changes to these structures, which can be reversed/ prevented with regular stretching.


Piriformis: Start in a press up position, and then pass one leg diagonally underneath you. Rest your weight down onto your elbows and down through the knee under your stomach, trying to get as flat to the floor as you can. You should feel the stretch deep inside the Gluteal region of your bent leg. Hold this for 30 seconds and repeat 3 times. Hamstrings: It is possible to stretch your hamstrings in several positions, but seated will allow you to progress to standing positions, as cyclist’s hamstrings are generally shortened due to riding postures. Sitting on the floor, keep one leg straight (which will be stretched) and bend the other up to your chest (for stability). Keeping the knee of your straight leg locked out reach as far down you shin towards your toes as you can and hold. Hold this for 30 seconds and repeat 3 times.


76 www.cyclingworldmag.com


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