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scenery was magnificent, the support crew amazing and the lessons learnt staggering.


Q A


How many hours riding do you do in a typical week?


If you averaged my training across the year it’s just short of 18 hours a week. The range is somewhere between 10 and 35 hours a week. Monday to Friday is mostly turbo sessions (morning and evening) and the weekends are long rides.


Cycling World Magazine


Q A


Q A


Apart from riding your bike do you do any other forms of training?


I don’t have time! I do some core work and have been known to pick up the


odd weight from time to time. Holidays invariably involve a kayak in the summer.


How much does science play a part in your approach to cycling?


Huge! I am lucky enough to be coached by Professor Simon Jobson


@cyclingworlduk


at Winchester University. My training plans are based on understanding my functional threshold power and my chronic training load. Training sessions are planned to work the different systems at work in the body. An occasional visit to the lab to be prodded, poked, bled and what feels like being ridden to collapse provide data on improvement. I also work with (amongst others) a nutritionist to help with energy and a psychologist to develop better mental techniques. The more I learn, the more I realise how much science can contribute to improvement.


March 2015 l Cycling World 103


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