This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
FEATURE I BRITISH CYCLING


CYCLING TIPS AND ADVICE FROM THE EXPERTS In addition to the supporting information of the training plans, you can also find numerous other articles on the site with information on all aspects of cycling. We have Great Britain Cycling Team coaches and backroom staff offering their expert advice on a range of topics including nutrition, training, and preventing injury, through to bike set-up, mechanics and many more. Whether it’s a gruelling sportive or a long training ride in preparation for one,


optimal nutrition is one of the key requisites for success. Team GB Nutritionist, Nigel Mitchell offers his advice to make sure you get your fuelling on the bike right. Here are few tips from Nigel.


“Aim to have your breakfast 90-120 minutes before you start riding. Porridge is the perfect pre-ride breakfast but, for longer rides, an additional 2-3 egg omelette will give you some more slow release energy”. “Sip at your bottle right from the start of


the ride. You should be aiming to consume 500-1000 ml of fluid per hour depending on your build and conditions”


Phil Burt, Lead Physiotherapist at British Cycling also offers his expertise, including tips on staying injury free, off the bike exercises and correct bike and equipment set-up. Here are a few tips from Phil. “Including non-cycling workouts in your training helps maintain motivation levels and allows you to develop a broader base of conditioning, making you more robust all- round and reducing your injury risk”. On saddle soreness: Even on flat rides, try to stand up out of your saddle every 10- 15 minutes to give your backside a bit of a break and to restore some blood flow.


INFORMATION:


If you are looking for further expert tips and advice like this to help improve your riding, you can find them at www.britishcycling.org.uk/sportives


16 www.cyclingworldmag.com


Page 1  |  Page 2  |  Page 3  |  Page 4  |  Page 5  |  Page 6  |  Page 7  |  Page 8  |  Page 9  |  Page 10  |  Page 11  |  Page 12  |  Page 13  |  Page 14  |  Page 15  |  Page 16  |  Page 17  |  Page 18  |  Page 19  |  Page 20  |  Page 21  |  Page 22  |  Page 23  |  Page 24  |  Page 25  |  Page 26  |  Page 27  |  Page 28  |  Page 29  |  Page 30  |  Page 31  |  Page 32  |  Page 33  |  Page 34  |  Page 35  |  Page 36  |  Page 37  |  Page 38  |  Page 39  |  Page 40  |  Page 41  |  Page 42  |  Page 43  |  Page 44  |  Page 45  |  Page 46  |  Page 47  |  Page 48  |  Page 49  |  Page 50  |  Page 51  |  Page 52  |  Page 53  |  Page 54  |  Page 55  |  Page 56  |  Page 57  |  Page 58  |  Page 59  |  Page 60  |  Page 61  |  Page 62  |  Page 63  |  Page 64  |  Page 65  |  Page 66  |  Page 67  |  Page 68  |  Page 69  |  Page 70  |  Page 71  |  Page 72  |  Page 73  |  Page 74  |  Page 75  |  Page 76  |  Page 77  |  Page 78  |  Page 79  |  Page 80  |  Page 81  |  Page 82  |  Page 83  |  Page 84  |  Page 85  |  Page 86  |  Page 87  |  Page 88  |  Page 89  |  Page 90  |  Page 91  |  Page 92  |  Page 93  |  Page 94  |  Page 95  |  Page 96  |  Page 97  |  Page 98  |  Page 99  |  Page 100  |  Page 101  |  Page 102  |  Page 103  |  Page 104  |  Page 105  |  Page 106  |  Page 107  |  Page 108  |  Page 109  |  Page 110  |  Page 111  |  Page 112  |  Page 113  |  Page 114  |  Page 115  |  Page 116