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FEATURE I RIDERSMATE


STAY SAFE ON THE ROAD


Cycling World explores this new concept that alerts your loved ones if you are involved in an accident.


Y explains:


“However careful and experienced you are, everyone falls off their bike at some point! Whilst in most cases, you’ll be left with nothing more than a few scrapes and a bruised ego – serious injuries do happen, and if you’re alone when they do, the consequences could be disastrous. Compact, robust and dependable, Ridersmate is there to protect you should the worst happen.”


Fitting easily onto both rider and bike, Ridersmate constantly records data about your location, speed, altitude and heading. If you fall off, Ridersmate immediately sends an emergency text to up to three contacts, letting them know where you are and how fast you were going when you fell off. Ridersmate is now entering the final stages of development and testing, and the company is launching a crowd-funding campaign on Kickstarter. Final release is expected to be early 2015.


INFORMATION:


To find out more about Ridersmate, keep up to date about the latest developments or to pre-order, head over to the website. www.ridersmate.com


108 www.cyclingworldmag.com


ou’re riding alone on a quiet road at night, when you fall off and injure yourself – how long before help arrives?


Enter Ridersmate – the world’s only dedicated GPS tracking device that automatically texts your loved ones if you have a serious accident. Set for launch in early 2015, Ridersmate is designed to provide the peace of mind that comes from knowing you won’t be left alone, injured and stranded.


David Coleman, Director of Ridersmate,


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