This page contains a Flash digital edition of a book.
The company hopes to have a beta


version of both the Simband and the resulting digital interfaces used for Sami by the end of 2014, in order to give other developers the chance to help progress ideas toward collecting and sharing health-related data. Another big player, computer giant


IBM, is focused on developing predictive analytics to aid predicting the outcomes of games. It's developed a tracking system designed to forecast who is most likely to win tennis matches. IBM's SlamTracker combines 39m data points gathered from seven years of Grand Slam tennis matches to determine each player’s pattern of play.


www.sportshandbook.com


IBM has focused on predictive analytics systems to assist professional coaches and broadcasters to predict outcomes


Used at the 2013 and 2014 Wimbledon


Championships, footage was taken from 3D cameras placed around the court as games were played to monitor how players were performing. The research data was then compared with footage to establish critical aspects of play that could help to determine the winner of the game. A similar system was tested during rugby’s Six Nations tournament, and IBM has


also been using its predictive analytics software in the English Premier League, where games featuring three top teams have been monitored. The IBM system has the additional


benefit of enhancing fan engagement, with fans able to observe a range of stats and metrics while games are played live. For this reason, the system has been put into operation on governing body the Rugby Football Union’s website. Similarly, the player-specific data that is obtained through devices such as Zepp and the FWD Powershot could potentially be used to supply viewers or commentators with more detailed information and analysis.


Sports Management Handbook 2014-2015 79


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